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Nintendo recently treated us to another Nindies Showcase, highlighting some of the most exciting upcoming Switch eShop games from independent developers. When these titles hit Nintendo's online store, they'll be joining an already robust arsenal of top-notch games from talented developers. You may have bought your Switch for first-party Nintendo masterpieces like Breath of the Wild and Super Mario Odyssey, but there has been a steady flow of incredible games from smaller teams in between the AAA releases, and some of them are simply too good to pass up. Click below to check out five must-have indie games on Nintendo Switch!

The Sonic & Sega All-Stars Racing series served as enjoyable racing games that would distract you long enough if you ever got sick of playing Mario Kart. Unfortunately, that's all they can be: a distraction. When you're looking for a great party game to play with your friends, the All-Star Racing games are rarely likely to be brought up. They suffer from slippery controls, questionable game mechanics, and a poor online structure.

Fortunately, SEGA has a chance to make up for all this, as they recently announced a brand new Sonic racing game. The company has confirmed it won't be a sequel to any games they've released, so this is their chance to start over from scratch. But for SEGA to even dream of competing with the big dogs like Mario Kart, there are a few things they'll need to work on.

Head inside for more!

Over 20 years after its debut, the Pokémon craze is as strong as ever, and the franchise is once again preparing to evolve on new hardware. With no official word, fans are left to speculate whether the upcoming Pokémon game for Nintendo Switch is the beginning of the eighth generation, a return trip to Sinnoh, or perhaps a series reboot. It could be any one of these, but another option Game Freak should consider exploring is a return to the beginning.

Hit the jump to see why the time is right!

Among the loads of indie games in development at the Enthusiast Gaming Live Expo this year, the one that stood out for me most was Polyball, a unique and fun to play physics-based platformer from a small studio known as Studio Monolith. Wearing their influences on their sleeves, the game takes the ball-rolling gameplay of Super Monkey Ball and the speed of Sonic the Hedgehog, but completely comes into its own and uses these elements into its own thing with an enticing, addictive experience.

Want to learn more? Hit the jump!

Among the many indie developers on the EGLX show floor is Oddbird Studio, an Oakville, Ontario-based studio founded by students from Sheridan College's Game Design program. Their claim to fame is with an award-winning arena fighter called Arrow Heads, in which you take control of bow and arrow-toting birds with a control scheme that's easy to use but quickly spirals to insanity.

Hit the jump for my hands-on impressions!

Nintendo Directs are always an exciting event for the Nintendo faithful, and tonight's presentation knocked it out of the park! Nintendo announced remakes like Luigi's Mansion and Bowser's Inside Story on 3DS, a port of the Crash Bandicoot N. Sane Trilogy to Switch, a new Super Smash Bros. game, and more! Out of all the show's exciting announcements, what has you the most pumped?

Hit the jump to share your Nintendo joy!

If you've been following the news lately, you have undoubtedly heard of the tragedy that happened in Parkland, Florida, a couple of weeks ago. This event has sparked a massive conversation around gun control, school safety, and mental illness.

It's amazing to see these conversations happening more regularly within the community. However, some politicians are taking a step backwards, choosing once again to place the blame of violent acts on video games. But even if the government intervenes, children will still play violent video games.

Read more after the jump.

The proliferation of loot boxes in video games has been one of the hottest and most controversial topics of the past year, and the story took the national spotlight back in November thanks to the catastrophic backlash against Star Wars Battlefront II. With gamers calling for changes and politicians calling for legislation, the Entertainment Software Rating Board has finally addressed the situation, but their solution probably isn't what you were hoping for.

Hit the jump for more.

While I didn't play all the major games that released in 2017, I did get to finish every single one that I had been anticipating since announcement. Gigantic franchises such as Persona, The Legend of Zelda, and Resident Evil received new installments this year. However, a smaller title told a story of sixteen high school students and a demonic teddy bear in 2017, and it was the most captivating experience I've had with video games all year.

Danganronpa fans outside of Japan have patiently waited for the newest installment to make its way to the West for several months. Danganronpa V3: Killing Harmony released all the way back in January in Japanese markets, and it wasn't until a few weeks ago on September 26th that we had our hands on an official English translation of the title.

The new title promised a few key features in its trailers: a separate story from the first trilogy, a female protagonist, and a story that centered on truth and lies rather than the usual hope and despair themes. This theming is very important in Danganronpa V3, and Spike Chunsoft expertly set this up in the very first chapter of the game.

I will warn you this article includes many spoilers for Chapter 1 of the game. I will not spoil anything past the end of this chapter, but I implore you to please play up to this point in Killing Harmony before you read this. If you've already played it, you should be fine. However, be wary of comments that may spoil other parts of the game as well.

Game companies, like many other businesses, don't like it when people try to lay claim to their ideas and products. They don't see value in allowing other people to offer their products for free through emulation, they aren't the biggest fans of cheap knockoff versions of their intellectual property, and they certainly have no desire to be one-upped by their own fans. As you've heard before in cynical comment sections and YouTube videos alike, these corporations are not your friends. You have no connection with these people and they are only after your money. If you make a fan project and they don't want it to exist, there's nothing stopping them from shutting that shit down. It's their IP to create and use. Not yours. This is the approach Nintendo has taken when it comes to anything that fans have created around their IP.

But this isn't the only way, as Sega has proven by doing things differently. When fan projects popped up around the Sonic franchise, rather than shutting those people down, Sega chose to hire those people and on-board them for their talent and passion for the franchise. With Sonic Mania, Sega hired a small army of passionate fans, and those very fans' efforts created the most widely acclaimed Sonic game in nearly a decade. No threats, no cease and desist letters, just results and progress. So why does Sega do what Nintendon't when it comes to fan support?

Head inside for more!

In 2011 Nintendo launched the "Nintendo 3DS Ambassador Program," granting then-owners of the Nintendo 3DS exclusive access to twenty downloadable games. The program included ten NES games, which were later released to the public as Virtual Console games, and ten Game Boy Advance games, which remain exclusive to Ambassador Program members to this day.

At Nintendo's latest investor meeting, one investor asked whether Nintendo has thought about distributing these games publicly. Senior Executive Officer Satoshi Yamato responded, and though he neglected to answer specifically whether these Game Boy Advance games will make it to the 3DS' public Virtual Console space, he did offer a glimpse into how Nintendo may distribute classic games in the future. Head inside to keep reading.

Console and PC gamers alike can rejoice to the sound of 1-on-1 fighting this weekend as Tekken 7 launches on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and Steam. The latest chapter of the arcade classic is powered by Unreal Engine 4, promising "highly detailed characters, dynamic animations, and unique environments."

Katsuhiro Harada, Franchise Director at BANDAI NAMCO Entertainment Inc., thinks it was well worth the team's diligent efforts, adding that:

"We've put our blood, sweat, and souls into bringing TEKKEN 7 to home consoles in the hope that new players and long-time fans will enjoy our work. This is a true passion project and I hope players will be able to feel [our] dedication to our art as they play TEKKEN 7." — Katsuhiro Harada

Raise your fists and jump right in for the full blow-by-blow coverage.

Are you going to E3 this year, or planning on watching from afar? Wherever you are, we've been advised to "start [our] countdowns!"

Yesterday, the official E3 Twitter released a handy timezone chart of the E3 2017 Press Conference Schedule. It all starts on Sunday, June 11th, and we already have an announcement from the new E3 Coliseum to be streamed through Facebook Live.

Stop wondering what happens when, and jump right in to find out!

I'm not shy about it: The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild is my favorite Zelda game — which makes it my favorite game of all time. It's a bona fide masterpiece that checked off the big-ticket wishlist items I've been yearning for from the series since before Skyward Sword. Its massive overworld and inventive action-adventure-RPG "physics and chemistry" system offers exactly the kind of unparalleled player freedom that put the series on the map way back in the '80s.

It's a pity that's not true of its dungeons.