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Nintendo is celebrating 127 years in business today, and over all of those decades (and especially the last three), they've left an incredible mark on the world. Nintendo characters like Mario and Donkey Kong are household names, and the company's vast catalog of memorable and innovative games have touched millions of lives, bringing joy to children of all ages around the world. Of all of Nintendo's franchises, which one has had the biggest impact on your life? Hit the jump to share your stories and celebrate Nintendo's anniversary!

There are tons of gaming podcasts in the wild, but Nintendo Week stands alone as it recaptures all the fun of Nintendo in the form of a weekly show. Every episode brings news recaps, discussions, games, music, and more to create a show for all kinds of Nintendo fans, whether they're new or old, passionate or passing-by.

Join the fun as we discuss the new series Pokémon Generations, new Ultra Beasts from Sun and Moon, Nintendo's strategy for making mobile vs. console games, Nintendo's new position for someone to enforce DMCA takedowns, Pokémon GO's further-declining numbers, and tons more. You can check out the episode after the jump—or if you'd like to save it to listen later, you can check the latest episode out on iTunes, available now. And be sure to head inside to get a rundown of all the Nintendo news from the past week!

We have gotten a ton of Pokémon Sun and Moon news these past few months. Everything from Pokémon reveals like the recent Passimian and Oranguru to awesome Z-Moves like Snorlax's Pulverizing Pancake has been shown off in full by the good folks at Game Freak. With all these great features being displayed, though, you might ask yourself: what is left to discover in the final game? Is Game Freak revealing too much about Pokémon Sun and Moon?

Make the jump for the rest of the article!

Society loves a scapegoat, and all too often it's gaming that cops the blame. The violent nature of video games comes under scrutiny in the wake of tragic shootings, while the rise in mental health issues is, at times, attributed to the increased prevalence of gaming. The concern is for an alleged generation of isolated and introverted youth, lacking in social development due to hours spent in virtual worlds.

Some argue that in many cases gaming is responsible for common mental health conditions including social anxiety and depression, born out of dissatisfaction with the real world in comparison to the virtual space. A similar phenomenon, termed "Pandoran Depression," followed the immensely popular James Cameron film Avatar in 2009, when mundane daily life fell short of how viewers perceived the idyllic fantasy world of the film.

As a means to see how gaming and mental illness correlate in reality, I spoke with four self-professed "gamers" who have also been diagnosed with mental health disorders. Despite their fears of stigma, Lucy, David, Paul, and Erin* bravely opened up to me about how gaming has impacted their struggle with mental illness, for better and for worse.

There are tons of gaming podcasts in the wild, but Nintendo Week stands alone as it recaptures all the fun of Nintendo in the form of a weekly show. Every episode brings news recaps, discussions, games, music, and more to create a show for all kinds of Nintendo fans, whether they're new or old, passionate or passing-by.

This year's Fall and Winter season is an unusually slow time for Nintendo fans, and most gamers who rely primarily on Nintendo hardly have anything new to play until March. So we thought now would be a perfect time to introduce a new segment called Indigo Plateau, where we build best-of lists about all things Nintendo. This week we explore our top five Wii U games—like Smash, Mario Kart, Shovel Knight, Splatoon, Donkey Kong, Pikmin, and tons more. You can check out the episode after the jump—or if you'd like to save it to listen later, you can check the latest episode out on iTunes, available now.

The stage was E3 2015. In an unprecedented move, Bethesda announced that Fallout 4 would have mod support on both Xbox One and PlayStation 4. If this wasn't enough, they then announced at E3 2016 that this service was coming to The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim Remastered when it launches this October. Bethesda made good on their promise to Xbox owners and released this function at the end of May, with promises that the PlayStation 4 version would be coming soon. After numerous delays, however, sadly this is no longer the case, as earlier today we learned that Sony was preventing Bethesda from offering mod support on the PS4.

This is certainly a big blow for Sony's Fallout 4 and Skyrim fans. But was Sony justified in blocking this action? Should Sony back off and let user-created mods run on the PlayStation 4? Let us know what you think inside!

The Legend of Zelda is one of the most iconic video game franchises of all time, and it has been my personal favorite series for as long as I can remember. From NES to Wii U, Link's adventures in Hyrule and beyond have always been some of my most memorable games on each console. Naturally, when I saw "#Top5ZeldaGames" lighting up Twitter, I had to get in on the fun. Narrowing the Zelda series down to just five entries is no easy task (the games number in the double digits if you include spin-off titles), but I've put together a list of five games that have a special place in my heart. Hit the jump to see my picks and leave your own!

There are tons of gaming podcasts in the wild, but Nintendo Week stands alone as it recaptures all the fun of Nintendo in the form of a weekly show. Every episode brings news recaps, discussions, games, music, and more to create a show for all kinds of Nintendo fans, whether they're new or old, passionate or passing-by.

Join the fun as we discuss Nintendo and Apple's budding relationship kicking off with Mario's first mobile game, before diving into tons of news from Pokémon Sun and Moon (including our theories about the story), Pokémon GO's Apple Watch launch, and more. You can check out the episode after the jump—or if you'd like to save it to listen later, you can check the latest episode out on iTunes, available now. And be sure to head inside to get a rundown of all the Nintendo news from the past week!

Independent video games have become more and more prominent as more people join the development community. Some turn out very well, receiving impressive amounts of publicity and sales, while others turn out to be broken, almost comical examples of what a video game should never be. For one reason or another though, indie games are often held to a vastly different standard than triple-A titles.

Hit the jump to read on!

Earlier today, The Pokémon Company hit us with a tidal wave of Pokémon Sun and Moon news, and one new feature that's turning a lot of heads is the Poké Finder. At designated points throughout the Alola Region, players can use the Poké Finder to photograph wild Pokémon, racking up points and unlocking more features as better pictures are taken. The feature should be a nice addition to the games, but many are hopeful that it signals something even more exciting. Could the Poké Finder pave the way for Pokémon Snap 2? Hit the jump to join the discussion!

Nintendo-based fan games have had a rough time of it as of late. Major fan releases with years of work behind them like AM2R and Pokémon Uranium have been slapped with DMCA takedown notices, forcing the developers to close the book on these games within days of the projects going live. While the devs usually respond graciously, many fans have been less than thrilled by it; we've seen numerous arguments in our comments and on Facebook between those defending Nintendo and those infuriated by the Big N's actions. But there's always at least one more group in there too: people mad at the media for reporting on the games, claiming that if we hadn't then Nintendo wouldn't have learned of them in the first place.

If that's the case, then should the media stop reporting on these games completely? Let's discuss that a bit more after the jump.

There are tons of gaming podcasts in the wild, but Nintendo Week stands alone as it recaptures all the fun of Nintendo in the form of a weekly show. Every episode brings news recaps, discussions, games, music, and more to create a show for all kinds of Nintendo fans, whether they're new or old, passionate or passing-by.

Join Alex, Ben, and Colin in an extra-long episode as they discuss tons of news from the past few weeks, including Nintendo's involvement with eSports, Pokémon GO's decline in users, recent and extremely thorough reports about NX, and tons more. After the break we dig into this morning's Nintendo 3DS Direct to discuss Super Mario Maker, Poochy & Yoshi's Woolly World, Zelda Amiibo, Animal Crossing, the 2D Pikmin game, and lots more.

You can check out the episode after the jump—or if you'd like to save it to listen later, you can check the latest episode out on iTunes, available now. And be sure to head inside to get a rundown of all the Nintendo news from the past week!

This morning, many of us woke up to an always-exciting event—a new Nintendo Direct! Lasting slightly over half an hour, this presentation focused mainly on upcoming 3DS titles, though a bit of other news worked its way in as well. As always, there were some brand new announcements, updates on games we've heard about before, and even some surprise releases today. Don't worry if you missed any of it—we've gathered all the stories in one place for your convenience. Hit the jump to see the stories!

Not long ago the Pokémon Company revealed that classic Pokémon would be returning with a new twist in Pokémon Sun and Moon: select Pokémon are getting special "Alolan Forms" unique to the new island region of Alola.

This inspired us in a recent episode of Nintendo Week, our Nintendo-themed podcast here at Gamnesia, where we decided to pitch our own ideas for Pokémon we'd like to see with new Alolan forms. Check out the discussion video after the jump for our full thoughts, or keep reading inside for a brief, brief summary.

Lots of RPGs use an equipment durability system, but most of the time, durability never quite feels right. You're in the middle of a quest, and you've brought your favorite sword. Eventually, your sword starts to dull. You either burn through a repair tool, check in with a smith in town to get it fixed, or switch to one of the other weapons you're carrying and press on. It doesn't make the game any more difficult or deep, but it's built into the gameplay loop anyway, seemingly just for the sake of it.

Zelda: Breath of the Wild also features an item durability system, but it does so in a much more thoughtful, purposeful way—such that durability is actually an integral part of the overall game balance, and it makes Breath of the Wild a better open-world game.