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[Throwback Thursday is a series where we look back on games from the past in reviews, retrospectives, and more. We will have something every week for your retro enjoyment. You may even discover something new to love!]

Few people in the States may have heard of Mega Man: The Wily Wars. Wily Wars is a compilation à la Super Mario All-Stars featuring 16-bit upgrades of Mega Man, Mega Man 2, and Mega Man 3, with an unlockable 3-boss game called Wily Tower after you beat the first three games. The reason so few people here may have heard of it is simple: it was only released on Sega Channel, Sega's short-lived download network for the Genesis. While the rest of the world enjoyed a full retail cartridge release of the game, we were limited access only through a somewhat expensive paid service. But Wily Wars lives on with the likes of importing, reproduction, emulation, and those weird At Games licensed systems. But is it worth it to find yourself a copy? Find out after the jump!

Tomodachi Life is not quite like any other game I’ve played; it’s a life simulator that makes a point not to simulate life. You don’t play God, like in The Sims; you don’t walk around improving your life and others’, like in Animal Crossing; you just throw Miis on an island and see what happens. It gives you a modicum of control over your Miis’ clothing, houses, possessions, and so on—almost like a Mad Libs story—and the rest is totally unpredictable.

For this reason, it’s very hard to communicate the nature of Tomodachi Life through text, which is why this review is going to follow a different format than you’re used to. Head inside to keep reading.

The words “Mario Kart” are practically—nay, literally—synonymous with the party racing genre. This is an incredible feat in its own right, so the challenge to improve the formula without making changes too radical becomes tougher with each new game. After the intuitive steering of Mario Kart Wii and the airborne and underwater sections of Mario Kart 7, this very balance seemed unthinkable for Mario Kart 8 to achieve.

And no, Mario Kart 8 does not achieve this balance; it exceeds this balance in ways I never thought possible. It unifies the ideas introduced in each new entry in the series in an entirely cohesive way. It adjusts the mechanics of speed and items and recovery so that unpredictability of blue shells and banana peels works toward a more fun end for everyone, rather than an unbalanced nuisance for those in the lead. And hot damn, check out those graphics!

Head inside to read our full review of Mario Kart 8!

Recently, I started up my PlayStation Plus subscription and I decided to see what free games the PlayStation 4 was offering. After downloading Resogun, I found this quirky little game, Stick it to the Man! I had never heard of this game until recently through word of mouth. Since it was free, I decided to check it out. I even asked myself, “What could possibly go wrong?” The result of this lone thought was one of the weirdest games I have ever played. Let us jump into this world of paper craft, mind reading, and all-night-long burrito-eating binges, and review Stick it to the Man!

Jump to read the rest of the review!

There are a million different ways to write game reviews, and somehow, I feel like every single one of them misses the point of gaming. They might say, "this is buggy," "the bosses are clever," or even the dreadful, "it's fun." Professional sites that are supposed to be leading this medium forward are plagued by impressionistic reviews that tell the reader diddley-squat (and yes, we're often just as guilty). The reason, I fear, is that nobody has any idea what the hell game reviews actually are.

The main purpose of a “review,” as we know it today, is to judge the quality of a game and explain why someone should or shouldn’t get it. But how do we do that? There are so many lenses through which we can examine games. We could explore the level design and mechanics; we could explore the narrative and how it’s conveyed; we could explore the difficulty curve and the feelings that instills in its players. These are all excellent ways of understanding the medium, but they don’t work when they have an ulterior motive—using any of them to declare a game’s overall worth seems downright crude.

So reviews must be something else… But what? Head inside to keep reading my thoughts, and be sure to head over to the comments to help us figure out what game reviews are supposed to be.

If you're reading this, chances are you've heard about Transistor, Supergiant's newest game and successor to their previous title Bastion. Like its predecessor Transistor is both a visual and audible masterpiece worth seeing and hearing at least once, but that won't make it a great game all on its own. Since its announced Transistor has been shaping up to be a title well worth playing, but did it deliver or did it end up being just another game not worth paying any attention to? Hop on in to read the review!

I am going to say this right now: I don’t think it is a bit much to ask developers to give us some variety and change when it comes to the games they are developing. With this new console generation finally starting up, we need to push the idea that we can have a varied gaming experience with a game, big or small. I know there have been studies saying that gamers don’t know what they want, but I find that statement snobbish, and anyone that says it makes them sound like condescending jerks. Variety is the spice of life, and the gaming industry needs to know that there are more kinds of games than Clash of Clans, Candy Crush Saga, and Call of Duty. That is why companies need to actually listen to what gamers want, or observe the indie scene to see what is going on, since the downloadable side of gaming is the only way, so far, to get some variety when it comes to gaming. With today’s review of Child of Light, Ubisoft is showing us why variety is nice. This is one of the best looking games around, and is one of the best RPGs that I have played this year. Why not jump on into this beautiful watercolor world, and see what makes this game so great?

Jump to read the review!

So, yeah, before you could say, “I want a sequel to NES Remix,” we got a sequel announced a mere few months after the first game was released. NES Remix was a fun set of WarioWare-style games, but due to a lack of super popular NES titles, it had some potential that was left on the cutting room floor. And I mean, did we really need Urban Champion or Pinball? Luckily, the gaming line-up for the sequel has basically an all-star cast of some of the most popular games of all time for the NES. I decided to write up a quick review of the sequel since there really isn’t that much difference between the two. How about we get started?

Yeah... it’s another Kirby game...” I thought as I roamed the early stages of Kirby: Triple Deluxe.
Yeah!! It’s another Kirby game!!” I thought shortly thereafter.

Kirby has always been deceptively complex for its runaway optimism, a legacy that Triple Deluxe wears as a badge of honor. Walking and jumping, of course, are the game’s base elements, while Kirby can also inhale objects and spit them back out to damage enemies and destroy nearby obstacles. By swallowing enemies, Kirby can gain one of twenty-six “Copy Abilities,” and the true fun of the game begins. Head inside to keep reading.

We know the Wii U and 3DS sales are not favorable compared to some of the more recent hardware releases out of Nintendo, but just how big is the difference when you slice it down to the same comparable time frame? Game Informer went ahead and did just that to create a slightly different look at how these systems are performing historically. Head inside to see 4 graphs detailing this.