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Gamnesia's reviews and editorial content by our top columnists tells you what you should think, or at least what's going on in our minds. Our opinion is, after all, better than everyone else's.

Nintendo recently treated us to another Nindies Showcase, highlighting some of the most exciting upcoming Switch eShop games from independent developers. When these titles hit Nintendo's online store, they'll be joining an already robust arsenal of top-notch games from talented developers. You may have bought your Switch for first-party Nintendo masterpieces like Breath of the Wild and Super Mario Odyssey, but there has been a steady flow of incredible games from smaller teams in between the AAA releases, and some of them are simply too good to pass up. Click below to check out five must-have indie games on Nintendo Switch!

Over 20 years after its debut, the Pokémon craze is as strong as ever, and the franchise is once again preparing to evolve on new hardware. With no official word, fans are left to speculate whether the upcoming Pokémon game for Nintendo Switch is the beginning of the eighth generation, a return trip to Sinnoh, or perhaps a series reboot. It could be any one of these, but another option Game Freak should consider exploring is a return to the beginning.

Hit the jump to see why the time is right!

The proliferation of loot boxes in video games has been one of the hottest and most controversial topics of the past year, and the story took the national spotlight back in November thanks to the catastrophic backlash against Star Wars Battlefront II. With gamers calling for changes and politicians calling for legislation, the Entertainment Software Rating Board has finally addressed the situation, but their solution probably isn't what you were hoping for.

Hit the jump for more.

(This editorial contains major spoilers for The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild.)

The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild's story is brilliantly executed, and it's primarily a result of its non-linearity. You, the player, can recall Link's lost memories in any order you wish. You can tackle other major plot elements surrounding the Divine Beasts and Hyrule's Champions in any order as well. Or you can just forego it all and face Ganon in the nude.

What many people seem to disagree about is how the actual plot of Breath of the Wild stacks up when compared to past Zelda games or other games in general. Some think the lack of a more human antagonist harms the story; others think the entire quest is much too simple: Link wakes up, fights Ganon, and saves the day.

Make the jump to find out why I think Breath of the Wild's story is anything but unfulfilling.

Pokémon Sun and Moon launched late last year to generally positive reviews and record-breaking sales, but that's not to say they're flawless experiences. Dated hardware and a few questionable design choices kept the twin games from being truly outstanding in my book, which is why I was thrilled when Eurogamer reported that a new and improved version of the seventh generation games is in the works for Nintendo Switch. Click below to check out five ways Pokémon Sun and Moon can be even better on Nintendo's next console!

The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild is one of the most highly-anticipated Nintendo games in years, and Nintendo has been keeping the hype strong with regular video teasers that highlight its features. One area that Nintendo hasn't spent much time on thus far is Breath of the Wild's story, especially in relation to previous games. While there are plenty of theories floating around based on the footage we've seen so far, Nintendo hasn't revealed the next Zelda adventure's place in the timeline, and they should keep it that way. Hit the jump for more!

The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time is widely considered one of gaming's all-time classics. Sales peaked at 7.6 million copies while Metacritic boasts an average review score of 99%. Its sequel, The Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask, however, didn't receive quite the same level of acclaim. It was, at most, a cult-classic, with bolstered popularity in recent years from online communities. The game went on to sell 3.36 million copies and still pulled a strong Metacritic score of 95%.

When it came time to breathe new life into Ocarina of Time and Majora's Mask with 3DS remakes, Nintendo took polar opposite approaches to developing each game. Nintendo and Grezzo held Ocarina of Time up as a masterpiece in need of a simple update. Majora's Mask, on the other hand, was treated like an inherently-flawed train wreck that needed to be salvaged. One has to wonder how such a negative development approach impacted the final product.

Nintendo is celebrating 127 years in business today, and over all of those decades (and especially the last three), they've left an incredible mark on the world. Nintendo characters like Mario and Donkey Kong are household names, and the company's vast catalog of memorable and innovative games have touched millions of lives, bringing joy to children of all ages around the world. Of all of Nintendo's franchises, which one has had the biggest impact on your life? Hit the jump to share your stories and celebrate Nintendo's anniversary!

Society loves a scapegoat, and all too often it's gaming that cops the blame. The violent nature of video games comes under scrutiny in the wake of tragic shootings, while the rise in mental health issues is, at times, attributed to the increased prevalence of gaming. The concern is for an alleged generation of isolated and introverted youth, lacking in social development due to hours spent in virtual worlds.

Some argue that in many cases gaming is responsible for common mental health conditions including social anxiety and depression, born out of dissatisfaction with the real world in comparison to the virtual space. A similar phenomenon, termed "Pandoran Depression," followed the immensely popular James Cameron film Avatar in 2009, when mundane daily life fell short of how viewers perceived the idyllic fantasy world of the film.

As a means to see how gaming and mental illness correlate in reality, I spoke with four self-professed "gamers" who have also been diagnosed with mental health disorders. Despite their fears of stigma, Lucy, David, Paul, and Erin* bravely opened up to me about how gaming has impacted their struggle with mental illness, for better and for worse.

The Legend of Zelda is one of the most iconic video game franchises of all time, and it has been my personal favorite series for as long as I can remember. From NES to Wii U, Link's adventures in Hyrule and beyond have always been some of my most memorable games on each console. Naturally, when I saw "#Top5ZeldaGames" lighting up Twitter, I had to get in on the fun. Narrowing the Zelda series down to just five entries is no easy task (the games number in the double digits if you include spin-off titles), but I've put together a list of five games that have a special place in my heart. Hit the jump to see my picks and leave your own!

Pokémon Sun and Moon's website recently updated, and with it came a few interesting comments from the games' director, Shigeru Ohmori. Among those, he talked about how our sun and moon inspired the naming of the games, and how he thinks about life on earth.

"We live on a planet overflowing with life. This earth of ours revolves around the sun, and in turn, the moon revolves around the earth. When you look at the sun and the moon from Earth, they appear to be traveling through the sky in similar orbits, but when you change your perspective, you come to realize that their orbits are completely different. Yet the Earth and the sun and moon are all tied to one another, and life grows and flourishes as they work their influence upon one another." — Shigeru Ohmori

Read more after the jump!

Just as relevant now as five years ago. Image credits paperfiasco

The Metroid series just celebrated its 30th anniversary this weekend, and if you’re like me, you were probably caught off guard. Unlike other critically and commercially successful franchises Nintendo has been milking every possible dollar out of, there hasn’t been a new Metroid game in six years. It’s been even longer since we’ve had an installment that really focused on exploration – once the hallmark characteristic of the series. And barring the upcoming Federation Force spinoff, there’s nothing else on the horizon. Why is this? How did we end up here? Why did Samus get relegated to red-headed stepchild status despite having a fanbase that’s turned almost every one of her adventures into a million copy seller?

My experience with The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild at E3 wasn't very epic or heroic. Most of my time was spent orienting myself within the game's environment. I dashed through some trees and climbed a few rocks, scouring for food and killing Moblins here and there. After one of the booth workers introduced me to fast travel, I teleported to a tower and promptly ran off it and died. Twice. All of this while Link only wore a pair of underwear.

But though my Breath of the Wild story mainly consists of accidental suicides and aimless meandering, it is still my story. Others roasted apples, some climbed mountains, and a lucky few even stumbled upon bosses. No demo was like the other; each player's adventure was uniquely their own. Everybody had their own story to tell after playing the E3 demo. Strike that. Those fortunate enough to land a spot in the game's seven-hour line had their own story to tell. The allure of a singular experience is what made The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild the breakout title of E3 2016, and it has also reinvigorated my adoration for this fabled franchise.

When the first-person shooter craze died down, it was inevitable that some genre would rise up and take its place. That is indeed what happened as open-world games—the ones in the vein of Assassin's Creed, Xenoblade Chronicles X, and Watch Dogs—burst on the gaming scene, and developers rapidly took notice. Even the Zelda franchise received the open-world treatment during E3, much to the delight of fans worldwide (though it may be argued that the open-world convention of Breath of the Wild is merely a return to traditions past).

The consequence is that one metric of apparent quality has risen just as fast: how large is the game's map? Witcher 3 and Fallout 4 were heavily scrutinized based on the sizes of the in-game worlds, gameplay and design choices notwithstanding. Likewise, people have speculated far and wide concerning the world size of the hotly anticipated Breath of the Wild, with some claiming it's as large as 170 square miles. However, this beckons the question: just how important are map sizes?

Many Nintendo fans were delighted to hear in January that Intelligent Systems, the team behind Paper Mario, was working on a new game in the beloved series for Wii U. But when it was formally revealed under the name Paper Mario: Color Splash, that joy turned to disappointment for some and outrage for others.

The first two games in the series—Paper Mario for Nintendo 64 and GameCube's Paper Mario: The Thousand-Year Door—are where many of its fans began. They were traditional RPGs with an inventive battle system and interesting story elements, all topped off by a unique kicker: everything in the world was made of paper. Super Paper Mario was an oddity, and then Sticker Star is where the issue truly began.