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The idea of a new classic Sonic the Hedgehog title was but a lofty and impossible dream. I grew up playing and enjoying Sonic game after game ever since I first got into the franchise proper with Sonic Adventure 2: Battle, but I kept coming back to Sonic Mega Collection in particular. As I played and replayed Sonic 3 & Knuckles ad nauseum over the years, I made peace with the fact that the classic chapter of the Blue Blur was over, as much as I wished to see a brand new retro entry someday...

Read on inside for the complete review!

As a big fan of Level-5's Professor Layton franchise, I had been waiting for Layton's Mystery Journey: Katrielle and the Millionaires' Conspiracy to be released since I first heard about it a year ago. I was afraid of what I might find, though. The last game we got was a mobile spin-off in 2013 entitled Layton Brothers: Mystery Room. While I seem to be the only person I know who even somewhat enjoyed it, I was fearful that this new game would follow in its footsteps too closely. I've been playing Millionaires' Conspiracy since it released this past Thursday, however, and I have, for the most part, been pleasantly surprised with what I found.

Head inside to read my thoughts on the newest Layton game and see if it's worth picking up!

At E3, Gamnesia had the opportunity to sit down and discuss Total War: Warhammer 2 (or as fans rightly call it, "Total Warhammer 2") with Game Director Ian Roxburgh. Following the success of the first Total War: Warhammer game, which merged the Total War gameplay with Games Workshop's popular (and also dead) Warhammer Fantasy universe, what will Creative Assembly do to make the sequel even better, and what role does things like fan feedback and DLC play in that process?

Read our interview after the jump!

In 2011 Nintendo launched the "Nintendo 3DS Ambassador Program," granting then-owners of the Nintendo 3DS exclusive access to twenty downloadable games. The program included ten NES games, which were later released to the public as Virtual Console games, and ten Game Boy Advance games, which remain exclusive to Ambassador Program members to this day.

At Nintendo's latest investor meeting, one investor asked whether Nintendo has thought about distributing these games publicly. Senior Executive Officer Satoshi Yamato responded, and though he neglected to answer specifically whether these Game Boy Advance games will make it to the 3DS' public Virtual Console space, he did offer a glimpse into how Nintendo may distribute classic games in the future. Head inside to keep reading.

When Adi Shankar announced that he was helming a production of Castlevania for Netflix, the general reaction I saw was filled with the usual outcries claiming that the show would be bad. Things didn't get much better once we got an official trailer, either. But like it or not, Castlevania is finally here, releasing on Netflix earlier today.

Will the short, two-hour season be a vampire killer, or will we get the Shaft as yet another awful video game adaptation hits the market? Head inside to see how this long-anticipated series turned out!

It is somewhat ironic that a remake of all things features so many firsts for a franchise. Fire Emblem Echoes: Shadows of Valentia boasts full voice acting, third person dungeon exploration, a revamped world map that actually matters, and lots of gameplay tweaks—for better or worse.

Without further ado, let us dive right in to see what the continent of Valentia has in store and see whether it is worth keeping!

We're only on the cusp of summer, but if you're anything like me, you're already over this heat. You can always go to a pool to cool off, but I've always thought that water gun battles were more fun. It seems like XSEED Games is thinking along those same lines, as it's bringing a new Senran Kagura game based around squirt guns to the West this summer.

I was able to sit down with Senran Kagura producer Kenichiro Takaki at E3 last week to discuss the franchise and its future. Head inside to see what he had to say!

It's been five months since Gamnesia's podcast crew got together to talk Nintendo, and with E3 fast approaching, we couldn't wait any longer. Join Alex, Ben, and Colin for a long-awaited new episode of the Nintendo Week Podcast, as we catch up on everything we've missed from Switch, 3DS, and more. After the break, Alex and I sit down to discuss our predictions for Nintendo at E3 2017.

You can check out all this and tons more in the episode after the jump—or if you'd like to save it to listen later, you can check the latest episode out on iTunes, available now.

It wasn't long ago that Nintendo surprised the world with its funky new game for Nintendo Switch: ARMS. The development team behind Mario Kart presents a completely different multiplayer outing with this colorful fighting game wherein every competitor is graced with extendable arms. It's a delightful concept reflective of Nintendo's signature whimsy, but does it have a leg to stand on? Find out more after the jump.

I'm not shy about it: The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild is my favorite Zelda game — which makes it my favorite game of all time. It's a bona fide masterpiece that checked off the big-ticket wishlist items I've been yearning for from the series since before Skyward Sword. Its massive overworld and inventive action-adventure-RPG "physics and chemistry" system offers exactly the kind of unparalleled player freedom that put the series on the map way back in the '80s.

It's a pity that's not true of its dungeons.

For whatever reason, Nintendo has gotten it in their heads that the value they bring to players comes from how unique they are.

I guess this is kind of true — no other console maker is betting the farm on a mascot Kart racing game ( Mario Kart 8 Deluxe), a 3D fighting game (Arms), a non-military shooter (Splatoon 2), a 3D platformer (Super Mario Odyssey), and a niche JRPG (Xenoblade Chronicles 2) in 2017.

But what makes Nintendo's games so compelling isn't that they're unique. It's that they're really, really good.

"I'm using tilt controls!" For some, this phrase might just be a way to spam the Mario Kart 8 online lobby. For others, it's a way of life. Mario Kart's tilt controls, introduced way back in Mario Kart Wii, have been a great way to make the franchise more accessible to players. If you're like me and you want to keep that golden steering wheel by your online alias in Mario Kart 8 Deluxe, transitioning from the Wii and Wii U wheel setup to the solo Joy-Con on Switch might be a little bumpy—but you've definitely got options.

Or you could just do the right thing and buy the first-party wheel accessory. Jump inside for a quick review.

In order to play Super Mario Bros., one does not have to think like an Italian plumber. The player does not have to think like a blue cartoon forest critter to speed through levels in Sonic the Hedgehog. But to play Snake Pass, you absolutely have to "think like a snake."

At least in terms of movement, every action on behalf of playable snake Noodle feels unlike anything ever before felt in platformers and adventure games. In terms of control, Snake Pass is one of the most original games in concept and execution. But does premise hold up to promise?

Read on to find out!

Just about anyone who is familiar with developer Rare's music knows the name David Wise. He is the prolific composer who has crafted famous tracks such as Aquatic Ambience and Stickerbrush Symphony for the Donkey Kong Country series and sprinkled his unique flair for a variety of styles in subsequent Rare games, including Diddy Kong Racing and Star Fox Adventures.

I was able to chat over email with David about some of his inspirations and how he worked on his most recent project: Snake Pass for Nintendo Switch, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. Make the jump to read our interview with this video game music legend!

Super Smash Bros. is a series of games that were made with the local couch competitor or party game scene in mind, but over time, it has largely been played by more competitive players. The newest title, Super Smash Bros. for Wii U and Nintendo 3DS, has had a competitive community since its release in late 2014. There are many resources out there for competitive players and spectators alike, but getting to your desired resources can require the user to manually sort through players, characters, and stages. This can be a tedious process.

SSBWorld, a website created by a team of two, aims to make it easier to connect all of these elements into an easy-to-use interface for finding videos of competitive Super Smash Bros. matches. Today, I got the opportunity to speak with Anthony Nelson, the face of SSBWorld, about how the website works and what sets it apart from the rest.

You can find the full interview after the jump!