What a wonderful day for a fright! Luigi's Mansion: Dark Moon is arriving in North America on March 24th with multiple mansions, a local multiplayer mode, and most hauntingly, the return of King Boo. We've seen art for the upcoming 3DS title before, but now it has been released in glorious high-resolution images that show off the gorgeously textured art style used in Luigi's Mansion 2.

In addition to the beautifully rendered character art, there are a ton of spooky scenes, eerie enemies, and much more shown off in several equally amazing yet very different art styles, so hop inside and take a look!

Satoru Iwata recently did a very interesting Q and A session on Nintendo of Japan's website. While there are a lot of interesting nuggets, several of them are so interesting we decided that focusing on them one at a time is really going to help highlight some of Nintendo's future plans. In this particular case Iwata is asked about cloud gaming. Many analysts and pundits have been pointing to a future where dedicated game consoles no longer exist. Once more, fans themselves feel this "next generation" (which has technically started already with the Wii U) could potentially be the last generation of such systems existing. Nintendo, however, sees a future where dedicated game consoles never die out.

Q. Cloud gaming is becomming popular. What about a unified platform?
Iwata: there are things you can do with cloud gaming and there are things you cant do. We dont agree that cloud gaming is the future and we are trying to work hard on a future where gaming only consoles are not gone. Unified platforms are for us not platforms that are one but rather platforms that have the same development architecture. This also means that there could be more platforms.

What do you think this truly entails?

One of Sega's time-honored traditions is that of Hedgehog Day; starting in 1994, when Sonic 3 was released, every February 2nd has been a special day that Sega generally orients towards their mascot. Sega has been hyping the day themselves recently, so this year there was a lot of excitement over a potential game reveal on February 2nd. Well, that's today, and Sega did indeed make a blog post...but it says they aren't ready to talk. That's all well and good, but...well, there just so happens to be a secret message in their blog.

Hit the jump to see what it is.

In the company's Q4 report for 2012, Nintendo's president Satoru Iwata revealed that there are games slated for a 2013 launch that the company has yet to announce. After waiting so long for Pikmin 3 to arrive on the Wii U and hearing more recent news about titles like Game & Wario and The Wonderful 101, it's fantastic to hear that Nintendo is waiting to announce some games until closer to their actual launch dates.

Q. What is the timeframe of the new software you were mentioning? What about the development structure?

Iwata: We are not thinking about a long time frame. We are thinking about midyear up to end of the year 2013. We also have games that are slated for end of the year that we haven't mentioned yet.

We already know there are games coming from Retro Studios and EAD, as well as several recently announced titles, but after such an incredible list of first-party software coming to the system, what else could there possible be waiting for us? Is there a massive interactive Pokémon game that makes use of the Wii U's NFC sensor? Is The Wind Waker not the only GameCube remake the Wii U will see in 2013? Is Nonspecific Action Figure actually taking the lead in a new franchise? Only time will tell the answers to these questions, but we can be sure 2013 is going to be one hell of a year for Nintendo fans.


Last month's announcement of Pokémon X and Y Versions was met with huge excitement from nearly every corner of the Nintendo fandom. Even many who have personal distaste for Pokémon admit that it's going to push the 3DS from "success" to "powerhouse." The staff here at Gamnesia recently had the opportunity to discuss our thoughts on Pokémon X and Y Versions. After several questions were posed by writer Jackson Murphy, the staff has combined to offer you our individual insights into Pokémon X and Y. In this roundtable discussion, you will see what the we hope X and Y Versions can achieve in expanding the world of Pokémon and much, much more.

What was your reaction to the reveal of Pokémon X and Y Versions

Nathan Janc: Well, I was excited initially because personally I haven't played much of any Pokémon game in a decade, since I kept waiting for some sort of noticeable advancement from the outside looking in. We got that now visually as they try to bring the game into a 3D world. It's exciting, and while not the greatest visually so far, it's a big step up for a Pokémon game. I was a bit put off by the fact that we’re still moving on a tile-based grid pattern instead of including all the axes of movement, but this is probably intentional to still force some trainer-on-trainer battles in single player. It's probably the most excited I've been since Pokémon Gold and Silver.

Head past the jump to see how everyone else feels.

We live in a time when so many novels, comic books, and even classic cartoons are being adapted into feature films that it can often be sickening. Given the history of game-to-film adaptions, it’s easy to hope the same money-grubbers that pumped out abominations like Alone in the Dark and House of the Dead never get their greedy hands on our other favorite games. However, we should know that history doesn’t have to repeat itself. Just because past video game movies have been bad doesn’t mean they can never be good.

I strongly believe that games don’t belong on the Hollywood radar unless the film can achieve, at a bare minimum, everything the game already means to us. Thus far, video game movies have been nothing but critical flops. But one thing to learn from the vast array of adaptions to film from other mediums is that their potential for success is equal to their potential for failure. As fanmade teaser trailers for Zelda and Metroid movies have proven to us, video games are no exception. What exactly does it mean for a video game movie to be “good,” and how can one ensure it will turn out well? First, we need to examine what makes any movie good. Head past the jump to keep reading.

Earlier, we brought up an interview from CNN, in which Erin Burnett doggedly pursued a 'guilty' verdict for violent games. The video has made quite a stir all over the internet, and now it isn't just gaming sites that are expressing their distaste; David Jaffe, mind behind the Twisted Metal and God of War franchises, has thrown his hat in the ring. We saw an interesting interview with Adam Sessler a few days ago; but that doesn't compare to one of the major game developers in the industry writing an angry response to a major news outlet.

Head inside to see what he said.

Super Smash Bros. is any Nintendo fan's dream game. From characters to stages, to music, to everything else, Smash is the ultimate celebration of Nintendo's past and present. But what about Smash's future? That's what Challenger Approaching is all about.

Every week, Chris London and I will present our thoughts on new characters, stages, items, and anything else for the next installment in the Super Smash Bros. series. Here at Gamnesia, we've completely overhauled the Challenger Approaching format with what is now an in-depth profile for every character. For the very first entry in this revamped series, we've assembled a profile for King K. Rool, the psychotic crocodilian king from the acclaimed Donkey Kong series. But don't think our analysis stops at just the character—there's plenty more to be seen. Hop inside to see why King K. Rool has earned a spot among Nintendo's finest in the next game's roster and what his inclusion would do for Super Smash Bros.


Even if you've never touched a Sonic the Hedgehog game (and if you haven't, what's wrong with you?) you likely know the general consensus of the past decade: Sonic's sixth generation games started off strong with Sonic Adventure and its sequel, delved into mediocre with Sonic Heroes and Shadow the Hedgehog. Meanwhile Sonic's seventh generation games started off abysmally with Sonic '06 and eventually climbed to greatness once again through Sonic Colors and Sonic Generations.

But in this climb to greatness, Sonic has created a huge yet seamlessly crossed rift between more restrictive, simplistic 3D speedrunning and more complex, traditional 2D platforming. The first impression one might have is that this gives Sonic games the best of both worlds. But does it, really? Does this unique "separate, yet combined" design truly make Sonic the best he can be, or does it create compromises that keep him from truly making "S Rank?" Hit the jump to find out!

It seems like we can't go a few days without a notable interview in the 'video game violence' debate pops up. Good lord, is this one a doozy. Erin Burnett, for CNN, started a piece on mass shootings by going over how gun legislation would hurt the economy, then mentioned a newly coined (and apparently common) phrase: Guns don't kill people, video games do. Cue her guest: psychologist William Pollack, author of the young boy culture study Real Boys. What follows is one of the more upsetting and interesting discussions on young violence I've seen in quite a while.

More after the jump.




Today we got a great trailer for God of War: Ascension. It's a prequel to the entire series, and it focuses on the vengeance Kratos wants to unleash on the God of War, Ares, for tricking Kratos in killing his wife and daughter.

Normally I'm not too fond of Sony's marketing department, but they've done something amazing with this trailer. One of the many criticisms of the franchise is that Kratos is a one-dimensional character, not having a developed personality, always angry. But one thing this trailer drives home, is that Kratos' got a reason to be angry.
After many responses from fans after the release of Resident Evil 6, Capcom has finally listened and intends to return the horror franchise to its roots. Capcom knows the franchise must go forward, even if a reboot is necessary. In an interview with IGN Masachika Kawata, a producer who has worked on the series for a long time, had this to say:

“I think that it’s important for us to have users’ needs in mind when making the games. At the same time I think a lot of what people want now is to have Chris and Jill in a game, or they want it to look like Resident Evil used to look like. That’s what makes the game work for them. We should be able to start from scratch and reboot it. It would still be Resident Evil. We wouldn’t lose the essential nature of what makes it a good game just by changing the characters." - Masachika Kawata
Plenty more from Mr. Kawata after the jump.

Welcome to Gamnesia's official launch! What is Gamnesia, you ask? Simply put, it is an all new video game news, editorial, review, and whatever-other-shenanigans-we-want-to-do website that now takes the place of all extra non-Zelda coverage at Zelda Informer. In many ways, it's a spiritual successor to Zelda Informer, but never fear because ZI isn't going anywhere. Instead, ZI will be returning to bringing you the latest and greatest in Zelda news, editorials, and walkthroughs. Meanwhile, Gamnesia will be it's own gaming hub for discussing games with the rest of the world.

Initially, we will be promoting Gamnesia a lot around Zelda Informer, but let’s not get into those semantics. Instead, let's talk about what's new for you, the fans. For starters, Zelda Informer has a slightly revamped layout. This puts all the emphasis back on Zelda and away from things that, really, many Zelda fans may not care about. In terms of both sites, they have been recoded from the ground up. This means much faster loading times and a better priority, so even if the site lags out the content itself will still be loaded. Oh, there is so much more... so hop inside!


The first convention of its kind, GaymerX was raised on Kickstarter to let queer geeks (and really, anybody, just about anywhere) conglomerate for three days out of the year and play together. I was initially looking for a gay gamer's resource on the net and stumbled across GaymerConnect, the social platform adjunct to the event. With a successful Kickstarter campaign, GaymerX became a reality for the first time in history this year. I experienced community, panels, cosplay, and an overall good time. Photocaps and anecdotes inside!

The newly-revived home video game industry, led by a behemoth electronics firm called Nintendo, has spun a series of competitors in recent years. SEGA launched the 16-bit Genesis, and several toy companies are trying to dip their toes in the water with consoles of their own, including NEC, Bandai, and Philips. But despite their best efforts, Nintendo still makes up approximately 90% of the market share for the video game industry. Amidst the competition, one tech firm has already made big progress on a deal to work with Nintendo on a system that could change the world of gaming as we know it.