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Game companies, like many other businesses, don't like it when people try to lay claim to their ideas and products. They don't see value in allowing other people to offer their products for free through emulation, they aren't the biggest fans of cheap knockoff versions of their intellectual property, and they certainly have no desire to be one-upped by their own fans. As you've heard before in cynical comment sections and YouTube videos alike, these corporations are not your friends. You have no connection with these people and they are only after your money. If you make a fan project and they don't want it to exist, there's nothing stopping them from shutting that shit down. It's their IP to create and use. Not yours. This is the approach Nintendo has taken when it comes to anything that fans have created around their IP.

But this isn't the only way, as Sega has proven by doing things differently. When fan projects popped up around the Sonic franchise, rather than shutting those people down, Sega chose to hire those people and on-board them for their talent and passion for the franchise. With Sonic Mania, Sega hired a small army of passionate fans, and those very fans' efforts created the most widely acclaimed Sonic game in nearly a decade. No threats, no cease and desist letters, just results and progress. So why does Sega do what Nintendon't when it comes to fan support?

Head inside for more!

In 2011 Nintendo launched the "Nintendo 3DS Ambassador Program," granting then-owners of the Nintendo 3DS exclusive access to twenty downloadable games. The program included ten NES games, which were later released to the public as Virtual Console games, and ten Game Boy Advance games, which remain exclusive to Ambassador Program members to this day.

At Nintendo's latest investor meeting, one investor asked whether Nintendo has thought about distributing these games publicly. Senior Executive Officer Satoshi Yamato responded, and though he neglected to answer specifically whether these Game Boy Advance games will make it to the 3DS' public Virtual Console space, he did offer a glimpse into how Nintendo may distribute classic games in the future. Head inside to keep reading.

Console and PC gamers alike can rejoice to the sound of 1-on-1 fighting this weekend as Tekken 7 launches on PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and Steam. The latest chapter of the arcade classic is powered by Unreal Engine 4, promising "highly detailed characters, dynamic animations, and unique environments."

Katsuhiro Harada, Franchise Director at BANDAI NAMCO Entertainment Inc., thinks it was well worth the team's diligent efforts, adding that:

"We've put our blood, sweat, and souls into bringing TEKKEN 7 to home consoles in the hope that new players and long-time fans will enjoy our work. This is a true passion project and I hope players will be able to feel [our] dedication to our art as they play TEKKEN 7." — Katsuhiro Harada

Raise your fists and jump right in for the full blow-by-blow coverage.

Are you going to E3 this year, or planning on watching from afar? Wherever you are, we've been advised to "start [our] countdowns!"

Yesterday, the official E3 Twitter released a handy timezone chart of the E3 2017 Press Conference Schedule. It all starts on Sunday, June 11th, and we already have an announcement from the new E3 Coliseum to be streamed through Facebook Live.

Stop wondering what happens when, and jump right in to find out!

I'm not shy about it: The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild is my favorite Zelda game — which makes it my favorite game of all time. It's a bona fide masterpiece that checked off the big-ticket wishlist items I've been yearning for from the series since before Skyward Sword. Its massive overworld and inventive action-adventure-RPG "physics and chemistry" system offers exactly the kind of unparalleled player freedom that put the series on the map way back in the '80s.

It's a pity that's not true of its dungeons.

For whatever reason, Nintendo has gotten it in their heads that the value they bring to players comes from how unique they are.

I guess this is kind of true — no other console maker is betting the farm on a mascot Kart racing game ( Mario Kart 8 Deluxe), a 3D fighting game (Arms), a non-military shooter (Splatoon 2), a 3D platformer (Super Mario Odyssey), and a niche JRPG (Xenoblade Chronicles 2) in 2017.

But what makes Nintendo's games so compelling isn't that they're unique. It's that they're really, really good.

"I'm using tilt controls!" For some, this phrase might just be a way to spam the Mario Kart 8 online lobby. For others, it's a way of life. Mario Kart's tilt controls, introduced way back in Mario Kart Wii, have been a great way to make the franchise more accessible to players. If you're like me and you want to keep that golden steering wheel by your online alias in Mario Kart 8 Deluxe, transitioning from the Wii and Wii U wheel setup to the solo Joy-Con on Switch might be a little bumpy—but you've definitely got options.

Or you could just do the right thing and buy the first-party wheel accessory. Jump inside for a quick review.

Super Smash Bros. is a series of games that were made with the local couch competitor or party game scene in mind, but over time, it has largely been played by more competitive players. The newest title, Super Smash Bros. for Wii U and Nintendo 3DS, has had a competitive community since its release in late 2014. There are many resources out there for competitive players and spectators alike, but getting to your desired resources can require the user to manually sort through players, characters, and stages. This can be a tedious process.

SSBWorld, a website created by a team of two, aims to make it easier to connect all of these elements into an easy-to-use interface for finding videos of competitive Super Smash Bros. matches. Today, I got the opportunity to speak with Anthony Nelson, the face of SSBWorld, about how the website works and what sets it apart from the rest.

You can find the full interview after the jump!

Two days ago, the highly anticipated Persona 5 launched in the West. While this was cause for great celebration for Atlus fans, the company also ticked a lot of people off with its policy about streaming the JRPG. This policy, which can be found in its entirety here, basically boils down to "Be careful not to spoil the game for people. If you do, we may try to shut down your channel." As the makers of the game, Atlus has a right to make suggestions on how to best experience it, but outright threatening to take down accounts is an abuse of power.

Read more of my thoughts on the matter inside!

A few days ago, Bungie  officially announced Destiny 2, followed by a teaser trailer and later, finally, an official reveal trailer. Now, I'm a self-professed Destiny mega-fan, so take my frenetic ravings with a grain of salt. But by just looking at the new trailer, it is clear that Destiny 2 will far surpass the original, specifically in the area of the story.

Destiny 2 has also been confirmed for PC and will have a beta in the summer. The game releases September 8th, and you can preorder the game now. Make the jump, watch the trailers, and keep reading.

As a competitive Splatoon player, I was a little worried about how I'd adapt to the changes introduced in the sequel. So when I had the opportunity to try out Splatoon 2 at the Switch Preview Tour's Los Angeles event (and the first couple rounds of the Global Testfire), I dove right in to see how well I'd adjust to the new game. If you're curious to know how Splatoon 2 feels on Switch after you've sunk hundreds of hours into the original, jump inside to find out!

Before the launch of the Switch, Nintendo spent a lot of time marketing 1-2-Switch as its killer multiplayer game. On the surface, it seemed a good idea. The entirety of the game revolves around looking at your opponent and engaging in 1 of 28 minigames designed to show off some of the Switch's more gimmicky features—I'm looking at you, Ball Count. But ultimately, it falls very flat, to the point where I would consider it more of a tech demo than a game. It showcased these concepts instead of proving them, thus failing to be the killer multiplayer game that Nintendo was hoping for.

On the other hand, there is a multiplayer game available right now that blows the pants off of 1-2-Switch in every way because it doesn't fall into this trap. That game is Snipperclips: Cut it Out, Together! by indie developer SFB Games. Head inside to read my full thoughts on the difference between these titles.

In just two days, The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild will finally launch worldwide on Nintendo Switch and Wii U. It will be the sixth 3D title in the Zelda series, the biggest and most important launch title for the upcoming Nintendo Switch, and, by all accounts, the most ambitious game Nintendo has ever worked on. To celebrate the release of Breath of the Wild, we decided to hold a vote and make an official staff-wide ranking of the ten greatest Zelda games of all time. In a few months' time, once we've all played Breath of the Wild, it's very possible that the game will end up at the top of each of our personal lists, so now seemed like a good time to make an official record of where we all stand.

Follow after the jump to take a look at the full list!

This past weekend Valve announced that they were ending the Steam Greenlight program and moving to an upfront-fee submission program called "Steam Direct." Instead of the current system, where developers pay a one-time $100 fee and the Steam community votes on which games should be allowed onto the store, developers will pay a $200–$5000 fee to directly place a game on the Steam Store.

At a passing glance this logic is sound. But head inside to read more.

"Nintendo is doomed." That's what the conventional wisdom should tell us, right?

I mean, they're about to release a console that has only a small handful games available at launch. Two of those games are party games, one of them is a toys-to-life game for kids, one of them is an indie Zelda clone, one of them is a retro revival— the only truly colossal game coming on Day One is the one and only The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild.

That's pretty bad, right? Head inside to keep reading.