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It's that time of year again, gentlemen. Football season. More importantly, the Super Bowl. Of course, being a game journalist, clearly I have no interest in anything without textures, bloom, or jiggle physics, so I put together a team of nothing but video game characters that I'll be fantasizing about a few seconds after kickoff on Superbowl Sunday. Now, I set me down some ground rules; mainly that they still have to abide by the standard conventions of football, so no ghosts bein' all impossible to tackle 'n junk like that.

Jump inside for my highly analytical list!

We live in a time when so many novels, comic books, and even classic cartoons are being adapted into feature films that it can often be sickening. Given the history of game-to-film adaptions, it’s easy to hope the same money-grubbers that pumped out abominations like Alone in the Dark and House of the Dead never get their greedy hands on our other favorite games. However, we should know that history doesn’t have to repeat itself. Just because past video game movies have been bad doesn’t mean they can never be good.

I strongly believe that games don’t belong on the Hollywood radar unless the film can achieve, at a bare minimum, everything the game already means to us. Thus far, video game movies have been nothing but critical flops. But one thing to learn from the vast array of adaptions to film from other mediums is that their potential for success is equal to their potential for failure. As fanmade teaser trailers for Zelda and Metroid movies have proven to us, video games are no exception. What exactly does it mean for a video game movie to be “good,” and how can one ensure it will turn out well? First, we need to examine what makes any movie good. Head past the jump to keep reading.

Super Smash Bros. is any Nintendo fan's dream game. From characters to stages, to music, to everything else, Smash is the ultimate celebration of Nintendo's past and present. But what about Smash's future? That's what Challenger Approaching is all about.

Every week, Chris London and I will present our thoughts on new characters, stages, items, and anything else for the next installment in the Super Smash Bros. series. Here at Gamnesia, we've completely overhauled the Challenger Approaching format with what is now an in-depth profile for every character. For the very first entry in this revamped series, we've assembled a profile for King K. Rool, the psychotic crocodilian king from the acclaimed Donkey Kong series. But don't think our analysis stops at just the character—there's plenty more to be seen. Hop inside to see why King K. Rool has earned a spot among Nintendo's finest in the next game's roster and what his inclusion would do for Super Smash Bros.


Even if you've never touched a Sonic the Hedgehog game (and if you haven't, what's wrong with you?) you likely know the general consensus of the past decade: Sonic's sixth generation games started off strong with Sonic Adventure and its sequel, delved into mediocre with Sonic Heroes and Shadow the Hedgehog. Meanwhile Sonic's seventh generation games started off abysmally with Sonic '06 and eventually climbed to greatness once again through Sonic Colors and Sonic Generations.

But in this climb to greatness, Sonic has created a huge yet seamlessly crossed rift between more restrictive, simplistic 3D speedrunning and more complex, traditional 2D platforming. The first impression one might have is that this gives Sonic games the best of both worlds. But does it, really? Does this unique "separate, yet combined" design truly make Sonic the best he can be, or does it create compromises that keep him from truly making "S Rank?" Hit the jump to find out!

Welcome to Gamnesia's official launch! What is Gamnesia, you ask? Simply put, it is an all new video game news, editorial, review, and whatever-other-shenanigans-we-want-to-do website that now takes the place of all extra non-Zelda coverage at Zelda Informer. In many ways, it's a spiritual successor to Zelda Informer, but never fear because ZI isn't going anywhere. Instead, ZI will be returning to bringing you the latest and greatest in Zelda news, editorials, and walkthroughs. Meanwhile, Gamnesia will be it's own gaming hub for discussing games with the rest of the world.

Initially, we will be promoting Gamnesia a lot around Zelda Informer, but let’s not get into those semantics. Instead, let's talk about what's new for you, the fans. For starters, Zelda Informer has a slightly revamped layout. This puts all the emphasis back on Zelda and away from things that, really, many Zelda fans may not care about. In terms of both sites, they have been recoded from the ground up. This means much faster loading times and a better priority, so even if the site lags out the content itself will still be loaded. Oh, there is so much more... so hop inside!


The first convention of its kind, GaymerX was raised on Kickstarter to let queer geeks (and really, anybody, just about anywhere) conglomerate for three days out of the year and play together. I was initially looking for a gay gamer's resource on the net and stumbled across GaymerConnect, the social platform adjunct to the event. With a successful Kickstarter campaign, GaymerX became a reality for the first time in history this year. I experienced community, panels, cosplay, and an overall good time. Photocaps and anecdotes inside!