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Excited about Mega Man's 25th Anniversary? A few months ago, Capcom announced its plan to bring the first six Mega Man titles to the Nintendo 3DS Virtual Console, and with the third game in the franchise coming in three days, it's great to see them give the classic Mega Man its proper due in light of recent fan outcries. Mega Man 3 will be available on Nintendo 3DS' Virtual Console service starting March 14th, while the fourth, fifth, and sixth entires in the famous series will be released in the following months.

What's more is that Capcom plans to release digital versions of the soundtracks to each of the six original Mega Man games. Barring this treatment plus a series reboot, this is just about the best possible time to be a Mega Man fan.

A few months ago, Vicarious Visions posted an image on Facebook of their team hard at work. What they didn't realize was that in the background, a large poster of a redesigned Crash Bandicoot could be seen quite clearly. After several commenters pointed the poster out, Vicarious Visions took the image down, which tells the keener viewers out there that this may not be the leftovers of a scrapped Crash Bandicoot reboot—this may be the beginnings of a new era for the orange menace.

Crash Bandicoot was originally designed as Sony's answer to Mario and Sonic, but in recent years, he has dropped off the map. But now, a countdown page has popped up and since been retracted, saying "HE'S BACK!" Boasting the logos of Vicarious Visions, the team that leaked the first image, and Activision, their parent company and owners of the Crash license, alongside Crash Bandicoot's immediately recognizable green eyes, it's quite clear that the creator of this page is just itching to unveil Crash Bandicoot's brand-new multiplatform adventure.

The fact that this website was quickly taken down further implies that Vicarious Visions mistakenly revealed something they had hoped to keep secret. Now that the news is out, the only question is when we'll see the full details of Crash and his glorious return.

Update: a user on NeoGAF has noticed a remarkable similarity between the wooden texture in this image and the wooden texture found here. While this doesn't disprove the legitimacy of this image, it certainly doesn't do it any good. When asked about the poster on the wall, Vicarious Visions co-founder Guha Bala seems particularly evasive, so there very well could be something in the works. But then again, there might not.

Get More:  MTV Shows

Shigeru Miyamoto recently sat down with MTV to talk about a few aspects of gaming and such, and in this first clip he talks about his favorite NES titles. For those who don't have the spare minute to check it out, his favorite titles are Baseball and Golf. Baseball was apparently a driving factor for the system having two controllers. In addition, the original Super Mario Bros. title held a special place for him and he really wanted to bring it to the NES and out of the arcades. What are some of your favorite NES titles?

Since its announcement, long-time fans of the PlayStation consoles have hoped that once-famous former icons of the PlayStation's early years, Crash Bandicoot and Spyro the Dragon, would be playable in PlayStation All-Stars Battle Royale. Much to fans' dismay, the two characters were not in the game's final roster and are currently unplanned as DLC, but while still quite far away, it would appear that the fans are closer than ever to making this dream a reality.

Thanks to a recent twitter campaign, Crash and Spyro may not be so unlikely for future rounds of PlayStation All-Stars Battle Royale DLC. They have solicited an official response via Twitter, and though it's no promise, if enough fans board the support train, Crash and Spyro may just become a reality.

@jordans69611482 Unfortunately, we can't promise that we can personally implement Crash and Spyro, but we'll be happy to send in any fellow fans' ideas or feedback. Thank you again! ^LM

— Activision Support (@ATVIAssist) February 28, 2013

If you'd like to see the orange and purple heroes playable in PlayStation All-Stars, head to the original thread and tweet to the appropriate people to voice your support. Or, if you prefer Lara Croft and CLoud Strife, you can check out their campaign as well.

Recently we had the pleasure of interviewing Grant Kirkhope, a sound designer best known for his work on the soundtracks to Rare titles from 1996 to 2008. Grant Kirkhope has since been nominated for several awards in composition for his more recent work on Kingdoms of Amalur: Reckoning, which has gained him some recognition in the film industry, though many retro game fans still recognize him today as one of the geniuses behind games like Banjo-Kazooie, Perfect Dark, Viva Pinata and GoldenEye 007.

During the interview, we discussed several aspects of his career and life, such as the closure of 38 Studios, Microsoft's acquisition of Rare, "Mingy Jongo," the current state of the gaming industry, and of course Mr. Kirkhope's methods, opinions and future in sound design and soundtrack composition. Head past the jump to read all about it!

Banjo-Kazooie is one of the most cherished games from Rare's heyday and one of the most well-received games on the Nintendo 64. For a long time, fans have hoped to see the quirky duo return to their former glory, and Nuts & Bolts didn't exactly do it for many. For the first time, however, Rare's development team has hinted that a remake of the original game may not be out of the question.

"This is probably an annoying question to you. Is there any possibility of a Banjo remake in 3DS? Like they did to Ocarina of Time." — Evan Cole, a fan

"Anything's possible, even if it's not very likely :)" — Rare Ltd.

Even though Rare is now owned by Microsoft, that doesn't restrict them from developing games on Nintendo's handheld devices. Rare released a remake of Diddy Kong Racing  and a new Viva Piñata game for Nintendo DS, and before they settled on Diddy, they considered a new Banjo game and even Donkey Kong Country 4.

Two years ago, Rare was in talks with Microsoft to develop games for Nintendo 3DS in a similar way, so it's not out of the question that they've reached a settlement. Would you like to see a Banjo-Kazooie remake on Nintendo 3DS?


Many of you readers may remember Cryamore, an indie game developed by a team of well-versed developers who took to Kickstarter to fund their project. After requiring only $60,000, the team ended up  with $242k, which means fans will see many new items, features, and most importantly, the game will be released on all home consoles.

But what exactly is Cryamore? The Kickstarter page has the answer.

"Imagine the barebones gameplay of Zelda, mixed with atmospheric elements from Metroid, action done in the style of Secret of Mana, the excitement of figuring out what element to use like Megaman, hand-drawn storybook backdrops like Legend of Mana, with comedic tones and a thriving in-game clock system like Brave Fencer Musashi; that's Cryamore in a nutshell."

But there is so much more. Head past the jump for a quick synopsis of the gameplay, and head to the Kickstarter page for all the in-depth information you can find about this exciting adventure.

Ever wondered what a team of dedicated Minecraft players united by one online server and a love of Super Mario 64 can do? Maybe they could successfully recreate every single area of the game? That's too hard, you say? Well, think again.

A team of Minecraft players have banded together on one server and dedicated themselves to accurately recreating every area of Super Mario 64. It's amazing what people can do given the proper tools and motivation. Head past the jump to check out all the amazing screenshots of their hard work.

Last month, Balloon Fighter was released to the Wii U eShop as the first game of Nintendo's 30-30-30 Virtual Console promotion. For just thirty cents, Wii U owners can download one preselected game each month, but there was a big problem for European users: Wii U Virtual Console games only ran at 50Hz, meaning that Nintendo slowed down games to cope with a lower refresh rate. While this may seem like a minor inconvenience, it can be a curse when playing games in real-time. Fans caused an uproar to see that Wii U Virtual Console games ran so slowly, and it seems that Nintendo has taken their complaints to heart.

Today, F-Zero is available as the second game in the 30-30-30 promotion, and according to various players, Nintendo has taken it upon itself to make the game available at 60Hz across all regions. Now PAL players can enjoy the game at full speed—which is especially important in a game like F-Zero. Hopefully this is the beginning of a rule, rather than the exception.

 

This controller had a lot of potential. Originally it was advertised as the Wii Controller Pro U, a three-in-one controller, containing a Wii Remote, Classic Controller, and Wii U Pro Controller, all in the shell of a Wii U Pro Controller. However, someone royally screwed up in the hardware department, because this controller only functions as the first two, so its appearance being nearly identical to the Wii U Pro Controller is going to cause some major dissatisfaction for customers who buy it believing it is a cheaper alternative to the Pro. It has been re-branded the Retro Classic Controller, and the labels on the packaging have changed to reflect the absence of Pro Controller functionality.

As previously stated, this controller has the same layout as the Wii U Pro Controller: four shoulder buttons, two analogue sticks and three menu buttons at the top and the D-Pad and face buttons at the bottom. There are also other additions to this controller, such as a pointer on the top, and clickable sticks. The clickable sticks are practically useless, as the left stick is just B and the right is Y. The most prominent feature of this controller at a glance, is that it has a mini SNES pad at the bottom of it, with all of the trinkets of the face of the original SNES pad. The A and B buttons are purple and convex, the Y and X buttons are lavender and concave, there's a very similar cross D-Pad, and there are even additional Start and Select buttons in the middle of it. It's a very nice touch.

Hop in for the full review, where I'll be discussing the technical aspects of the controller.

Nintendo wasn’t necessarily the first, the last, or the only, but when it comes to boss designs that have two floating hands, a floating head and completely lack a body, Nintendo sure does use them a lot. From decades ago right up to this day Nintendo and its subsidiaries have perfected this seemingly overused boss concept.

This feature takes a look back at some of the most memorable bosses with two floating hands and a head over the years. They may have been used in everything from The Legend of Zelda, to Super Mario, to Kirby and Donkey Kong, but so long as they remain fun there’s no complaints here on this similar reused design. Let us reflect back nostalgically on some of the favorites.

In the new week, look out for a review of a great new game "Anodyne" released by Indie developer Analgesic Productions.  But for now, you can appreciate the poise with which they chose to deal with pirates.

Analgesic’s Sean Hogan actually went ahead in comments left on torrent sites and Reddit and gave away gift keys to the Desura version, asked players for feedback, and requested a Steam Greenlight vote if pirates enjoyed the game.

BioWare seems to be getting a bit defensive when anyone asks them about Mass Effect 4. This is because they don't want to "relate" the game to the original trilogy, as in have it held back by what they have done previously. They do not want to imply the game is following Commander Shepard's footsteps.

"To call the next game Mass Effect 4 or ME4 is doing it a disservice and seems to cause a lot of confusion here," BioWare community manager Chris Priestly wrote on the company's forums.

As understanding as I am of this sentiment, it left me wondering... what am I supposed to call it? Well, maybe we have the answer. More quotes after the jump!

Super Smash Bros. is any Nintendo fan's dream game. From characters to stages, to music, to everything else, Smash is the ultimate celebration of Nintendo's past and present. But what about Smash's future? That's what Challenger Approaching is all about.

Every weekend, Chris London and I will present our thoughts on new characters, stages, items, and anything else for the next installment in the Super Smash Bros. series. Here at Gamnesia, we assemble in-depth profile for every character. For the second entry in this ambitious series, we've assembled a profile for Little Mac, the tiny boxer and poster boy for Punch-Out!! But don't think our analysis stops at just the character—there's plenty more to be seen. Head past the jump to see why Little Mac has earned a spot among Nintendo's finest in the next game's roster and what his inclusion would do for Super Smash Bros.



Carlos Eiene, a small-scale YouTube pianist, has just released a medley of Nintendo songs for piano in celebration of hitting 200 subscribers. The medley covers a huge amount of Nintendo's history, from the early release of Donkey Kong to modern games such as Super Mario Galaxy. This type of video may remind some Kyle Landry, famous for impeccable improvisation and inspired video game medleys, but the vast inter-franchise content covered by Eiene and the memories he brings through his celebration of Nintendo's history is admirable in its own right.

If you liked this medley, you may also want to have a listen to his jazz cover of the music from Kakariko Village.