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In the new week, look out for a review of a great new game "Anodyne" released by Indie developer Analgesic Productions.  But for now, you can appreciate the poise with which they chose to deal with pirates.

Analgesic’s Sean Hogan actually went ahead in comments left on torrent sites and Reddit and gave away gift keys to the Desura version, asked players for feedback, and requested a Steam Greenlight vote if pirates enjoyed the game.

BioWare seems to be getting a bit defensive when anyone asks them about Mass Effect 4. This is because they don't want to "relate" the game to the original trilogy, as in have it held back by what they have done previously. They do not want to imply the game is following Commander Shepard's footsteps.

"To call the next game Mass Effect 4 or ME4 is doing it a disservice and seems to cause a lot of confusion here," BioWare community manager Chris Priestly wrote on the company's forums.

As understanding as I am of this sentiment, it left me wondering... what am I supposed to call it? Well, maybe we have the answer. More quotes after the jump!

Super Smash Bros. is any Nintendo fan's dream game. From characters to stages, to music, to everything else, Smash is the ultimate celebration of Nintendo's past and present. But what about Smash's future? That's what Challenger Approaching is all about.

Every weekend, Chris London and I will present our thoughts on new characters, stages, items, and anything else for the next installment in the Super Smash Bros. series. Here at Gamnesia, we assemble in-depth profile for every character. For the second entry in this ambitious series, we've assembled a profile for Little Mac, the tiny boxer and poster boy for Punch-Out!! But don't think our analysis stops at just the character—there's plenty more to be seen. Head past the jump to see why Little Mac has earned a spot among Nintendo's finest in the next game's roster and what his inclusion would do for Super Smash Bros.



Carlos Eiene, a small-scale YouTube pianist, has just released a medley of Nintendo songs for piano in celebration of hitting 200 subscribers. The medley covers a huge amount of Nintendo's history, from the early release of Donkey Kong to modern games such as Super Mario Galaxy. This type of video may remind some Kyle Landry, famous for impeccable improvisation and inspired video game medleys, but the vast inter-franchise content covered by Eiene and the memories he brings through his celebration of Nintendo's history is admirable in its own right.

If you liked this medley, you may also want to have a listen to his jazz cover of the music from Kakariko Village.

Even if you've never touched a Sonic the Hedgehog game (and if you haven't, what's wrong with you?) you likely know the general consensus of the past decade: Sonic's sixth generation games started off strong with Sonic Adventure and its sequel, delved into mediocre with Sonic Heroes and Shadow the Hedgehog. Meanwhile Sonic's seventh generation games started off abysmally with Sonic '06 and eventually climbed to greatness once again through Sonic Colors and Sonic Generations.

But in this climb to greatness, Sonic has created a huge yet seamlessly crossed rift between more restrictive, simplistic 3D speedrunning and more complex, traditional 2D platforming. The first impression one might have is that this gives Sonic games the best of both worlds. But does it, really? Does this unique "separate, yet combined" design truly make Sonic the best he can be, or does it create compromises that keep him from truly making "S Rank?" Hit the jump to find out!