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We all know a day will rise, likely in our lifetimes, that Shigeru Miyamoto will no longer be with Nintendo making games. He will ride off into the sunset, forever enshrined in the halls of one of gaming's greatest minds. However, that time is not now, so we will hold off on reflecting upon his stellar career. That being said, while Miyamoto has stated he has no timetable set for his retirement and his actual work load hasn't gone down, he is trying to get Nintendo's team leads and the younger developers to start thinking more freely on their own. Less Miyamoto, more influx of fresh ideas.

“This year I’m past 60; I’m going to be turning 61 this year. So for me to not be thinking about retirement would be strange. But in fact, the number of projects I’m involved in–and the volume of my work–hasn’t changed at all.”

“Instead, what we’re doing internally is, on the assumption that there may someday be a time when I’m no longer there, and in order for the company to prepare for that, what I’m doing is pretending like I’m not working on half the projects that I would normally be working on to try to get the younger staff to be more involved."
More inside.

Nintendo of America recently wrote to the Assistant US Trade Representative for Intellectual Property and Innovation, Mr. Stanford McCoy, on the issue of game piracy. The report written by Nintendo is part of US copyright holders annual chance to make anti-piracy recommendations for the Special 301 Report.

Political jargon aside, Nintendo’s report pleads with the government to work on better tackling foreign piracy; blocking file-sharing websites; and harsher prosecution of people who pirate games. Nintendo cites “huge losses” as the reason behind their propositions.

In their report Nintendo mentions Mexico, China, Brazil and Spain as the highest offending countries when it comes to piracy of their products, and suggests plans of action to reduce piracy in each region. Read on for some of Nintendo’s general comments and the link to the full, quite lengthy, report.

Mario is an icon. In a gaming culture increasingly focused towards guns and marketing, Mario still manages to stand tall in his red shirt and blue overalls. While the Mario games explore all sorts of genres, the heart and soul of Mario—where is all began—is on a 2D plane, running across the Mushroom Kingdom and stomping down Koopas along the way. When IGN had the chance to discuss Mario with the director and producer of Mario's latest adventure, New Super Mario Bros. U, they explained that as consoles evolve, it gets harder and harder to innovate Mario without losing the simple yet fun gameplay that makes Mario so wonderful.

“When we finished [New Super Mario Bros. Wii] up, we thought,'It’s gonna be hard to add any new features to this.' Once we started fleshing out the next concept, though, we realized that we could still come up with new ideas for [New Super Mario Bros. U]. Right now, I can’t really say what might come next, but I think we’ll still manage to find new stuff for the series. I think that innovation is important, but it can’t be something that destroys the core fun that defines Mario in 2D. We need innovation that retains 2D Mario’s play sensation"

Head past the jump to keep reading.


Yesterday morning, Nintendo held another Nintendo Direct stream, this time for Japan only and based around Nintendo 3DS. The stream is all in Japanese, but it shows off Monster Hunter 4, a new game by Mega Man creator Keiji Inafune, and a game in which giant robots fight each other to unfitting music. But that's not all; there's still Castlevania, Professor Layton, and much, much more! The video is all in Japanese, but if you're interested to see some of what the 3DS might have in store (for Japan, anyway), be sure to check it out. Or if you'd prefer, you can find a breakdown of the stream's information right here.


A long time ago, some time in 1992, someone at Nintendo thought it would be a good idea to stay after regular work hours and 'work up some fun' in the office and among employees. By this, I don't mean kinky fun, but rather the kind that leads to organic, masterful come-up-from-behind games. Legend of Zelda: Link's Awakening started out as a Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past port for the Game Boy, but the freedom of the working context allowed the team to turn the game into an original project.

And original it was. Dubbed in Japan Legend of Zelda: Dream Island, the game was written before Koizumi ever ventured into the markedly dramatic territory of Legend of Zelda: Majora's Mask. No, Link's Awakening was rather a representation of interesting developments at Nintendo HQ. One where, despite the rigorous expectations of a Japanese task force, projects were formed on the basis of an up-and-coming company, a company of passionate developers and designers with a certain creative flow...

Pokémon Black and White took players into the all-new Unova region where the series both underwent some change while also remaining mostly the same. Black and White marked the beginning of Generation V on the Nintendo DS, meaning that it was the first time two generations had graced one console. That made it more apparent than ever that some additional change would necessary.

To an extent, Black and White spiced up the Pokémon formula with new battle formats—in triple and rotation battles—as well as an increased focus on storyline. Overall, however, Pokémon Black and White remained the same with the eight-gym format and the same battle system we’ve known for decades.

More than anything, Black and White proved that the Pokémon formula remains strong even after all of these years. With almost 15 million copies sold, Nintendo and Game Freak decided to capitalize by rushing out some quick sequels. Instead of the Generation III remakes that many fans expected, they got a more original quest in Black and White 2, which served as an extension of the originals' story. Were these sequels truly worth it, or were they just a cheap ploy at cash?


I love me some portal, but I sure wish I could solve all of Aperture's mind-bending puzzles on the go. While the day when Portal because a portable title may well be a long ways away, this DS Homebrew by Smealum sure gives us an idea of what Portal on the Nintendo DS could be like. The mod is described as being "Nowhere near playable," at the current time, but the nifty video shows off quite a few staples of the franchise. Included are the Portal Gun, Energy Balls, and best of all, the Companion Cube!

"This is still extremely early footage so please don't be too harsh. Lots of debug features are present, including the ability to fly, see portals through walls and move cubes from a distance. Also, keep in mind this was shot in an emulator which provides good but still less than perfect rendering. As such, be aware that most (not all, but still) of the graphical glitches you can see in this video don't happen on hardware (mostly the portal transition is a lot nicer on an actual DS)."


I may be more of a Nintendo gamer than I am a PlayStation or Xbox gamer, and arguably a bigger PC gamer than any of the consoles, but even I know that blocking used games is going to be a console killer. We already know the Wii U doesn't do such things. I can attest to this because I own a used copy of New Super Mario Bros. U. Sure, maybe it only saved me $5, but that's still $5 I was able to put towards a pre-order for Pikmin 3. The fact remains that if this does happen, or if they attempt to do an "ultimate pass" for $100 which allows gamers to "unlock" unlimited used games, I tend to agree that the Wii U will reap the benefits of higher game sales since they will have the used game market all to themselves.

To be honest, I don't want any of the console makers to fail, so I just hope all these rumors (some dating a year old) just tend to be complete crap.


This week's Bonus Round focus's squarely on genre preferences. You might be surprised to see what genre's are mentioned as it's not necessarily what many would expect. As an example, one of the panel's favorite genres is Tower Defense! Of course while it's a nice debate above, what we really want to know is what your favorite genre is. Sound off in the comments and let the debates begin!

According to Emily Rogers, Retro Studios will have a demo ready for its next big project during E3. It's still unclear what this project might be, but it could very well be sequel to Donkey Kong Country Returns, or another installment of the Metroid series. Retro also collaborated with Nintendo on the development of Mario Kart 7, and since it was a very well received game, it might very well be that they are also working on the upcoming Mario Kart U.

Personally, I'm all in for a Donkey Kong sequel, but I'd like it to be a platformer like Donkey Kong 64. I think it has a lot of potential, and I just love Donkey Kong 64. It was one of the games that defined my childhood, so a spiritual sequel to it would be great. I'd be really surprised to see a brand new IP, but time will tell.

For fans of the Pokemon series, there is nothing like the thrill of event-distributed Pokemon (given that you are able to take part, at least). If you're a fan of event Pokemon, then do we have a treat for you!

First off, the legendary Pokemon Keldeo is currently available via WiFi distribution, meaning that you can pick up yours at any time from the comfort of your own home! This Keldeo is available to anyone with Pokemon Black 2 and Pokemon White 2, and it comes with the moves Sacred Sword, Hydro Pump, Aqua Jet, and Swords Dance. Be sure to download your Keldeo before February 12th, though, as that's when this event is over.

Additionally, owners of Pokemon Black and White or Pokemon Black 2 and White 2 can get Meloetta from your neighborhood GameStop store from March 4th until March 24, as seen in the image to the left (I never said GameStop employees could spell). There's no word yet on what moves or special characteristics this Pokemon will have, but we'll be sure to let you know when you know more!

How do you feel about event Pokemon? Are they a pain, or are they worth the journey into the store?

Nintendo has so many iconic franchises, it’s ridiculous. Out of the big three companies, only Nintendo has unique franchises that are hitting their 25th anniversary. The Ratchet and Clanks, Jak and Daxters, and Sly Coopers of the PS2 era were phenomenal while they lasted, but eventually waned in popularity or just ceased being made altogether. Somehow, Mario, Link, and even Fox McCloud with his rather small staple of games have managed to stay relevant to gamers and maintain enormous fanbases. For a game series to survive decades, it has to evolve with the times, right?

I’d like to think that the secret to Nintendo’s success has been adaptability. However, looking back, It's hard to accept that as truth.

More after the jump.

Even if you've never touched a Sonic the Hedgehog game (and if you haven't, what's wrong with you?) you likely know the general consensus of the past decade: Sonic's sixth generation games started off strong with Sonic Adventure and its sequel, delved into mediocre with Sonic Heroes and Shadow the Hedgehog. Meanwhile Sonic's seventh generation games started off abysmally with Sonic '06 and eventually climbed to greatness once again through Sonic Colors and Sonic Generations.

But in this climb to greatness, Sonic has created a huge yet seamlessly crossed rift between more restrictive, simplistic 3D speedrunning and more complex, traditional 2D platforming. The first impression one might have is that this gives Sonic games the best of both worlds. But does it, really? Does this unique "separate, yet combined" design truly make Sonic the best he can be, or does it create compromises that keep him from truly making "S Rank?" Hit the jump to find out!