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I'm not shy about it: The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild is my favorite Zelda game — which makes it my favorite game of all time. It's a bona fide masterpiece that checked off the big-ticket wishlist items I've been yearning for from the series since before Skyward Sword. Its massive overworld and inventive action-adventure-RPG "physics and chemistry" system offers exactly the kind of unparalleled player freedom that put the series on the map way back in the '80s.

It's a pity that's not true of its dungeons.

For whatever reason, Nintendo has gotten it in their heads that the value they bring to players comes from how unique they are.

I guess this is kind of true — no other console maker is betting the farm on a mascot Kart racing game ( Mario Kart 8 Deluxe), a 3D fighting game (Arms), a non-military shooter (Splatoon 2), a 3D platformer (Super Mario Odyssey), and a niche JRPG (Xenoblade Chronicles 2) in 2017.

But what makes Nintendo's games so compelling isn't that they're unique. It's that they're really, really good.

"I'm using tilt controls!" For some, this phrase might just be a way to spam the Mario Kart 8 online lobby. For others, it's a way of life. Mario Kart's tilt controls, introduced way back in Mario Kart Wii, have been a great way to make the franchise more accessible to players. If you're like me and you want to keep that golden steering wheel by your online alias in Mario Kart 8 Deluxe, transitioning from the Wii and Wii U wheel setup to the solo Joy-Con on Switch might be a little bumpy—but you've definitely got options.

Or you could just do the right thing and buy the first-party wheel accessory. Jump inside for a quick review.

In order to play Super Mario Bros., one does not have to think like an Italian plumber. The player does not have to think like a blue cartoon forest critter to speed through levels in Sonic the Hedgehog. But to play Snake Pass, you absolutely have to "think like a snake."

At least in terms of movement, every action on behalf of playable snake Noodle feels unlike anything ever before felt in platformers and adventure games. In terms of control, Snake Pass is one of the most original games in concept and execution. But does premise hold up to promise?

Read on to find out!

Just about anyone who is familiar with developer Rare's music knows the name David Wise. He is the prolific composer who has crafted famous tracks such as Aquatic Ambience and Stickerbrush Symphony for the Donkey Kong Country series and sprinkled his unique flair for a variety of styles in subsequent Rare games, including Diddy Kong Racing and Star Fox Adventures.

I was able to chat over email with David about some of his inspirations and how he worked on his most recent project: Snake Pass for Nintendo Switch, PlayStation 4, Xbox One, and PC. Make the jump to read our interview with this video game music legend!

Super Smash Bros. is a series of games that were made with the local couch competitor or party game scene in mind, but over time, it has largely been played by more competitive players. The newest title, Super Smash Bros. for Wii U and Nintendo 3DS, has had a competitive community since its release in late 2014. There are many resources out there for competitive players and spectators alike, but getting to your desired resources can require the user to manually sort through players, characters, and stages. This can be a tedious process.

SSBWorld, a website created by a team of two, aims to make it easier to connect all of these elements into an easy-to-use interface for finding videos of competitive Super Smash Bros. matches. Today, I got the opportunity to speak with Anthony Nelson, the face of SSBWorld, about how the website works and what sets it apart from the rest.

You can find the full interview after the jump!

Two days ago, the highly anticipated Persona 5 launched in the West. While this was cause for great celebration for Atlus fans, the company also ticked a lot of people off with its policy about streaming the JRPG. This policy, which can be found in its entirety here, basically boils down to "Be careful not to spoil the game for people. If you do, we may try to shut down your channel." As the makers of the game, Atlus has a right to make suggestions on how to best experience it, but outright threatening to take down accounts is an abuse of power.

Read more of my thoughts on the matter inside!

A few days ago, Bungie  officially announced Destiny 2, followed by a teaser trailer and later, finally, an official reveal trailer. Now, I'm a self-professed Destiny mega-fan, so take my frenetic ravings with a grain of salt. But by just looking at the new trailer, it is clear that Destiny 2 will far surpass the original, specifically in the area of the story.

Destiny 2 has also been confirmed for PC and will have a beta in the summer. The game releases September 8th, and you can preorder the game now. Make the jump, watch the trailers, and keep reading.

Before the launch of the Switch, Nintendo spent a lot of time marketing 1-2-Switch as its killer multiplayer game. On the surface, it seemed a good idea. The entirety of the game revolves around looking at your opponent and engaging in 1 of 28 minigames designed to show off some of the Switch's more gimmicky features—I'm looking at you, Ball Count. But ultimately, it falls very flat, to the point where I would consider it more of a tech demo than a game. It showcased these concepts instead of proving them, thus failing to be the killer multiplayer game that Nintendo was hoping for.

On the other hand, there is a multiplayer game available right now that blows the pants off of 1-2-Switch in every way because it doesn't fall into this trap. That game is Snipperclips: Cut it Out, Together! by indie developer SFB Games. Head inside to read my full thoughts on the difference between these titles.

We at Gamnesia are always looking to grow both our staff and our audience—and wouldn't you know it, here we are, growing our staff! We're looking for volunteers to help run the show here, from writing to editing and more. If you've ever wanted to join the gaming industry as a journalist, now's your chance to start! We have no age requirement—our writing staff ranges from high school students to fully-functioning adults—nor do we care whether or not you have past experience working in games media. All we want you to bring to the table is a talent for writing and a genuine love of the game.

Head inside to find out more!

In just two days, The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild will finally launch worldwide on Nintendo Switch and Wii U. It will be the sixth 3D title in the Zelda series, the biggest and most important launch title for the upcoming Nintendo Switch, and, by all accounts, the most ambitious game Nintendo has ever worked on. To celebrate the release of Breath of the Wild, we decided to hold a vote and make an official staff-wide ranking of the ten greatest Zelda games of all time. In a few months' time, once we've all played Breath of the Wild, it's very possible that the game will end up at the top of each of our personal lists, so now seemed like a good time to make an official record of where we all stand.

Follow after the jump to take a look at the full list!

This past weekend Valve announced that they were ending the Steam Greenlight program and moving to an upfront-fee submission program called "Steam Direct." Instead of the current system, where developers pay a one-time $100 fee and the Steam community votes on which games should be allowed onto the store, developers will pay a $200–$5000 fee to directly place a game on the Steam Store.

At a passing glance this logic is sound. But head inside to read more.

"Nintendo is doomed." That's what the conventional wisdom should tell us, right?

I mean, they're about to release a console that has only a small handful games available at launch. Two of those games are party games, one of them is a toys-to-life game for kids, one of them is an indie Zelda clone, one of them is a retro revival— the only truly colossal game coming on Day One is the one and only The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild.

That's pretty bad, right? Head inside to keep reading.

It is hard to deny that The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild is one of the most highly anticipated video games in history. It is the most ambitious game that Nintendo has ever worked on, and the flagship launch title for the company’s new console, the Nintendo Switch.

Despite the fact that Breath of the Wild looks great, Nintendo’s marketing decisions surrounding it have been less than stellar from the start. The game has been delayed several times, and although one could argue that these delays were a good decision overall, it’s undeniable that they were received negatively by fans who expected to play the game by the end of 2015. Many of the trailers have been less than stellar (in fact, the second time we ever got to see the game, it was shown off through poor-quality off-screen gameplay footage). Now, a little over two weeks before the game’s launch, Nintendo announced that it’s releasing DLC for Breath of the Wild, a first for the Zelda series; although this might seem like good news at first, Nintendo’s poor timing and out-of-touch announcement have unsurprisingly alienated loads of fans.

Head inside for more!

Pokémon Sun and Moon launched late last year to generally positive reviews and record-breaking sales, but that's not to say they're flawless experiences. Dated hardware and a few questionable design choices kept the twin games from being truly outstanding in my book, which is why I was thrilled when Eurogamer reported that a new and improved version of the seventh generation games is in the works for Nintendo Switch. Click below to check out five ways Pokémon Sun and Moon can be even better on Nintendo's next console!