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Nintendo recently treated us to another Nindies Showcase, highlighting some of the most exciting upcoming Switch eShop games from independent developers. When these titles hit Nintendo's online store, they'll be joining an already robust arsenal of top-notch games from talented developers. You may have bought your Switch for first-party Nintendo masterpieces like Breath of the Wild and Super Mario Odyssey, but there has been a steady flow of incredible games from smaller teams in between the AAA releases, and some of them are simply too good to pass up. Click below to check out five must-have indie games on Nintendo Switch!

The Sonic & Sega All-Stars Racing series served as enjoyable racing games that would distract you long enough if you ever got sick of playing Mario Kart. Unfortunately, that's all they can be: a distraction. When you're looking for a great party game to play with your friends, the All-Star Racing games are rarely likely to be brought up. They suffer from slippery controls, questionable game mechanics, and a poor online structure.

Fortunately, SEGA has a chance to make up for all this, as they recently announced a brand new Sonic racing game. The company has confirmed it won't be a sequel to any games they've released, so this is their chance to start over from scratch. But for SEGA to even dream of competing with the big dogs like Mario Kart, there are a few things they'll need to work on.

Head inside for more!

Over 20 years after its debut, the Pokémon craze is as strong as ever, and the franchise is once again preparing to evolve on new hardware. With no official word, fans are left to speculate whether the upcoming Pokémon game for Nintendo Switch is the beginning of the eighth generation, a return trip to Sinnoh, or perhaps a series reboot. It could be any one of these, but another option Game Freak should consider exploring is a return to the beginning.

Hit the jump to see why the time is right!

If you've been following the news lately, you have undoubtedly heard of the tragedy that happened in Parkland, Florida, a couple of weeks ago. This event has sparked a massive conversation around gun control, school safety, and mental illness.

It's amazing to see these conversations happening more regularly within the community. However, some politicians are taking a step backwards, choosing once again to place the blame of violent acts on video games. But even if the government intervenes, children will still play violent video games.

Read more after the jump.

Who doesn't love a good boss fight? I know I do. I'm drawn to the grandeur of the battles. The epic soundtracks, the intricate character designs, the combination of strategy and execution—there's nothing quite like these challenges. Perhaps that's why boss rush-style games like Cuphead or Furi have become so popular in recent years. As a fan of the genre, I recently sat down with a Steam Early Access game entitled Ragtag Adventurers to see if it holds up.

Are these adventurers going on a fruitful quest, or will their journey be for naught? Read our review to find out!

When it comes to tight, difficult platformers, Super Meat Boy may be the most prominent example, but there are others just as worthy of the descriptor. One such game is Celeste, a full-fledged adventure from Matt Thorson (of Towerfall fame) and Noel Berry. You may be familiar with an earlier PICO-8 game of the same name, also by Thorson and Berry, and it is this version that serves as the foundation on which Celeste is built.

Come journey with me up a mountain as I discuss why Celeste is one of the best platformers I've played in years.

When one thinks of tough video games, there are a few that likely come to mind. Many gamers would jump immediately to Dark Souls, or in more recent times, Cuphead, for instance. While that's certainly accurate, my mind often jumps to a different genre entirely: platformers, specifically Team Meat's Super Meat Boy. To me, Super Meat Boy is one the best indie games on the market. It is a bit dated, having first come out in 2010, but it's also seen quite a few re-releases on many different platforms. Now, by popular demand, Team Meat has brought the magic of Super Meat Boy to Switch.

How does Super Meat Boy hold up on Nintendo's portable console? Read our review to find out!

There was a point in time when 3D platformers dominated the video game market. However, gaming trends have evolved, and now most games seem to feature a more open world experience. With these larger worlds, 3D platforming games have become scarce, mostly coming from Nintendo and SEGA. But with the rise of indie game developers, this genre is being revitalized with a passion we've never seen before. A Hat in Time is one of several 3D platformers to release this year, and it represents everything you could possibly want in a modern day title from this genre.

Difficulty. It is something that no entertainment medium other than video games has to contend with. Our input as players defines our experiences with our games, in particular how challenging they are. One need only be present for a song or movie to finish in order to get the full experience. In order to get through a game however, one must be skilled enough to adapt to the requirements of whatever game is being played to "win" in the end. Some games give us fairer challenges than others, and it is in evolving game design where either frustration or satisfaction on behalf of the player are born.

So gamers, make the jump if you want to know what makes us tick when it comes to facing our virtual demons!

For a free game, Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp accomplishes a remarkable amount: being able to appeal to millions of players who have never played an Animal Crossing game before, introducing new elements to the franchise, creating a streamlined version of seeing more design options and animal friends than ever before in a relatively short period of time, and simplifying gameplay for all ages and interest levels. Without further ado, let's go camping!

Read the full op-ed to understand why I think Pocket Camp is just right for a Nintendo mobile game for all parties involved!

Yes, there is actually a game behind all the controversy surrounding the microtransactions the world cannot stop speaking about. As a disclaimer, this review will focus solely on the microtransactions-free single player campaign of Star Wars Battlefront II. The multiplayer seems to be an addicting setup for Star Wars fans who have self-control enough to not spend their hard-earned cash on elements (with some time) unlocked otherwise through playtime, but for nerds like me, the single-player game is a refreshing break from the hectic, wily realm of multiplayer for a canon tale worthy of the famous brand.

Force jump inside for the full campaign review!

For fans of Sonic the Hedgehog, the Blue Blur's 25th anniversary closed on a pretty good note with Sonic Boom: Fire & Ice in 2016, but not without teasing two major return-to-form titles in the coming year. Blue believers who grew up with a SEGA Genesis in their youth—or a Mega Collection of sorts in later years like myself—were promised a brand new 2D game developed by community all-stars who would embrace nostalgia and reimagine the classic Sonic experience. On the other hand, those who enjoyed Sonic's more recent adventures were teased with Sonic Team's very own "Project Sonic 2017," bringing Modern Sonic not only back to Boost-style gameplay last seen in Sonic Generations, but also to darker and more serious storytelling of the pre-Colors games.

Hit the jump for the rest of the review!

Super Mario games pretty much always have polish. As such, the former plumber's games are usually great platforming adventures with some whimsical designs and tight controls. That being said, it's difficult to say the series has retained its unique sense of charm in the past decade. Super Mario Galaxy was the last time the core series of games really reinvented itself, with the more linear games since making some slight improvements, but none that broke any innovative new ground for Super Mario. I guess it is extremely fitting, then, that the brand new sandbox 3D game in the franchise feels like the freshest adventure Mario has had in more than ten years.

Jump off of Cappy to read our full review of the new most popular title for the Nintendo Switch!

Video games enrich our lives. Chances are, if you are reading this, you share some level of the appreciation and admiration for them as an entertainment medium and art form that a lot of us do. Sometimes just playing these bundles of joy is not enough, either. We feel the urge to talk about the gameplay, stories, and audiovisual symphonies that whisk us away through adventures both big and small. That's why I write about them: because there has to be some place for these thoughts to go.

Make the jump into this full opinion piece to read why I think we all, in some form or another, should be video game journalists.

Danganronpa fans outside of Japan have patiently waited for the newest installment to make its way to the West for several months. Danganronpa V3: Killing Harmony released all the way back in January in Japanese markets, and it wasn't until a few weeks ago on September 26th that we had our hands on an official English translation of the title.

The new title promised a few key features in its trailers: a separate story from the first trilogy, a female protagonist, and a story that centered on truth and lies rather than the usual hope and despair themes. This theming is very important in Danganronpa V3, and Spike Chunsoft expertly set this up in the very first chapter of the game.

I will warn you this article includes many spoilers for Chapter 1 of the game. I will not spoil anything past the end of this chapter, but I implore you to please play up to this point in Killing Harmony before you read this. If you've already played it, you should be fine. However, be wary of comments that may spoil other parts of the game as well.