Subscribe to the PS4 channel on Gamnesia

Latest PlayStation 4 Updates


I've been waiting days to cover this story because I wanted to better frame my approach. See, 3.4 million copies of a game are some pretty lofty numbers. Sure, maybe that's a poor number for say, a console Zelda release, but it's still a profitable number. Tomb Raider's original popularity may never be matched, but since the 90's the franchise has been pretty pathetic in sales numbers, failing to even top 1 million.

In comes a highly touted and well reviewed reboot of the whole franchise. It moved 3.4 million physical copies across all platforms, the most the series has moved since the 90's. In addition, if you add digital sales, you're likely looking at a number north of 4 million total sales. That ranks it as the 3rd best selling game in the series and probably when it's all said and done, potentially the 2nd best. That, to me, seems like a very successful reboot. The fans are raving, the critics are raving, people bought the product, and things seem fine.

Until we find out that Square lost money on the project. So much so they themselves called it a failure. So, what's wrong?

The above trailer is interesting, as it takes a look at the other side and watch exactly Aiden Pierce is doing with the ctOS system he is using to hack things. The game only gets more intriguing from this, because it sort of paints Aiden as a vigilante. He steals money from honest people, but he also helps out those who may be in trouble with an experimental Chicago police system that indicates threat levels. It's interesting, and I have never been more excited to know this game is coming to the Wii U. I truly hope they fully integrate ctOS into the GamePad, because this is one game where it actually makes a lot of sense and wont kill any immersion.

Is it E3 yet?

Excited for Assassin's Creed IV: Black Flag? It's alright not to be, we did just get ACIII nearly half a year ago. But Black Flag surely is doing its best to expand upon its gameplay by letting players take to the seas to not only wage war against other ships, but to search the ocean floors for treasure and battle sharks. The trailer also shows the on-land portions of the game and the forests/jungles the players can traverse are simply stunning, looking lush and vibrant from all angles. It may not divulge much upon the story of Black Flag, but it's bound to at least garner your interest so be sure to check it out!

Do you remember the days when we only used one term to describe a console’s power? Twenty years ago, what people saw as “bits” were all that mattered and we could tell when one console was better than another simply by looking at the games. One needn’t any more insight than his own eyes to see that Donkey Kong Country was more advanced than the arcade’s Donkey Kong or that Sonic the Hedgehog could do more than Alex Kidd in Miracle World.

Fast forward to today and how do we compare consoles? Jargon. Twenty years ago, people didn’t debate the relative merits of a “Customized 6502 CPU” and a “Television Interface Adaptor Model 1A” because a system’s power could be easily described by marketers as “bits,” and every generation self-evidently doubled the power of the last. But those days, as you certainly know, are gone.

These ever-improving graphics were always one good reason to buy a console, but alongside visual improvements, each generation’s new technology brought us bigger and better ways to play our games. The new Mode 7 technology of the Super Nintendo, for example, allowed racing games like F-Zero and Super Mario Kart to take off, while the jump to 32 and 64-bit consoles allowed for full 3D gaming, which was a monumental advancement in its own right. During this time, advancements in technology went hand-in-hand with advancements in gameplay, but when the core fundamentals of a video game have reached their limits, companies look for other, less essential ways to improve the experience.

Head past the jump to keep reading!

Last month at Sony's PlayStation Meeting, Blizzard announced that the latest entry in the widely popular Diablo series would be making its way to PlayStation 3 and PlayStation 4 at some point in the future.

This partnership between Blizzard and Sony was implied to be exclusive, but now it appears it may not be as great for Sony as we thought.

"We don't have any announcements to make at this time, but we're not necessarily a Sony exclusive."

Another bright point to note is that one of the biggest issues that plagued Diablo III on PCs was the lack of an offline play and dozens of server crashes, which, in conjunction with one another, left the game unplayable for a while. On the console version of Diablo III, however, you will be able to play the full game offline with up to three friends, which "feels very collaborative," at least on the PlayStation 3.

It looks like Diablo III is shaping up to be a great console gaming experience from a franchise that's been so strongly rooted on the PC. Will you be picking Diablo III up on a home gaming consoles?

Well, the 3DS may have lost it's #1 spot for a week, but the sales for the PS Vita are now starting their decline since the big price drop. Meanwhile, the 3DS sales have increased slightly and remain very study. The 3DS sales have been study for some time in Japan, and not even a price cut of the Vita really slowed down the sales. I am not trying to trash the Vita at all - in earnest it's a pretty nice piece of hardware with a great interface (better than the 3DS). However, you can't beat content quality compared to the 3DS. Unfortunately for Vita owners, there are but a handful of games worth owning, while the 3DS seems to have hit after hit coming out for the foreseeable future. Exact numbers after the break.

I definitely have had some fun with Call of Duty: Black Ops II on my Wii U. It has a fairly active online community and all of the modes are very pick up and play. It's nice when I don't want to take things too seriously or when I don't have a lot of time to game. In many ways, that makes it sort of a casual experience, since anyone can really play and feel like they are accomplishing something. It reminds me a lot actually of Goldeneye back in the N64 days.

John Gibson, President of Tripwire Interactive (Folks behind Killing Floor and Red Orchestra 2), talked extensively to PC Gamer about how Call of Duty is ruining the FPS generation of players these days. The main reason? It's taken what was previously a hardcore only experience and turned it into a mainstream casual style genre. Don't believe that? Think Call of Duty is a hardcore gamer's game? Hop inside to see why that's not the case.


It's no secret that the modern gaming market is a lot less stable than it was a few years ago. I was hoping to write a lengthy editorial on this very subject, but the brilliant minds at CleverNoobs have just done so in video form! This feature takes an in-depth look at the gaming crash of 1983 and the parallels between it and today. Discussing the effects of DLC, online gaming, and retooling old games, CleverNoobs explains why the current market is in a state of upset and what we can all do to try to avoid it—and even why a crash may ultimately be a good thing. CleverNoobs has done a wonderful job at explaining the state of the industry, and as educated gamers, this is an essential video to watch.

A few months ago, Vicarious Visions posted an image on Facebook of their team hard at work. What they didn't realize was that in the background, a large poster of a redesigned Crash Bandicoot could be seen quite clearly. After several commenters pointed the poster out, Vicarious Visions took the image down, which tells the keener viewers out there that this may not be the leftovers of a scrapped Crash Bandicoot reboot—this may be the beginnings of a new era for the orange menace.

Crash Bandicoot was originally designed as Sony's answer to Mario and Sonic, but in recent years, he has dropped off the map. But now, a countdown page has popped up and since been retracted, saying "HE'S BACK!" Boasting the logos of Vicarious Visions, the team that leaked the first image, and Activision, their parent company and owners of the Crash license, alongside Crash Bandicoot's immediately recognizable green eyes, it's quite clear that the creator of this page is just itching to unveil Crash Bandicoot's brand-new multiplatform adventure.

The fact that this website was quickly taken down further implies that Vicarious Visions mistakenly revealed something they had hoped to keep secret. Now that the news is out, the only question is when we'll see the full details of Crash and his glorious return.

Update: a user on NeoGAF has noticed a remarkable similarity between the wooden texture in this image and the wooden texture found here. While this doesn't disprove the legitimacy of this image, it certainly doesn't do it any good. When asked about the poster on the wall, Vicarious Visions co-founder Guha Bala seems particularly evasive, so there very well could be something in the works. But then again, there might not.

Coming right after a week where Ubisoft leaked everything from a game's name to its announcement trailer before its official reveal, you'd expect they would get the situation under control, but Ubisoft has managed to leak yet another Assassin's Creed-related image. As you can see above, the image displays the logo for "Assassin's Creed: Phoenix Rising." It's hard to imagine Ubisoft would flood the market this much with new big-budget Assassin's Creed titles, so perhaps this is another Vita game à la last year's Assassin's Creed III: Liberation. Or perhaps this is has something to do with the Assassin's Creed film? Time will tell what Phoenix Rising really means—so long as this isn't a masterfully crafted prank.

Anita Sarkeesian is attempting to tackle a rather prolific topic: Woman in video games. The above video is part 1 of massive series of videos she will be putting on on the topic to reach her ultimate conclusion. The video project was funded via Kickstarter and so far, so good in my book. The above video touches upon a common trope used not just in games but in all areas of the media. Sure, it hurts at times seeing Miyamoto thrown out there as one of the godfather's of this movement in games, but it's not far from the truth.

I think it's nice too where she says she too grew up on these same games and she enjoys playing them, so it's not like this topic is necessarily about the games design. This topic is strictly about how woman are depicted in gaming. We gladly look forward to the next part in the series. It's a very touchy topic, but I think she has done a good job touching base on it so far. Oh, and for those that want to mention how in Double Dragon she helps beat the boss in the end - so does Zelda, it doesn't mean she's not a damsel in distress.

Everyone by now is at least remotely familiar with the indie phenomenon Minecraft. Though Minecraft is available on PCs and mobile devices, the only home console the game has been available on has been Xbox 360 for quite some time. This is due to an exclusivity deal developer Mojang has with Microsoft, but as revealed in a recent interview, that all could change sometime soon. Jens Bergensten, lead designer of Minecraft: Pocket Edition, had this to say:

Microsoft has an exclusivity deal for consoles. When it runs out we’ll consider Minecraft for PlayStation, but Wii U is very unlikely.

Though the language here doesn't imply that this contract will end any time soon, the fact that they're discussing the contract's end is certainly telling. This quote, however, got me wondering exactly which console Bergensten was referring to as "PlayStation" and why the Wii U is such an unlikely candidate, and it turns out that the situation may not be so simple with the Wii U. Head past the jump to read more.

Since the reveal of the PlayStation 4, Sony fans have wondered what will become of the PlayStation 3. In September, it was revealed that Sony would continue to "support" the PlayStation 3 through the next few years, presumably in a similar manner to the PlayStation 2's situation since the third in Sony's console line came along in 2006. What exactly this means is a little vague, but luckily, Jim Ryan, CEO of SCE Europe, is here to give us an answer.

Where does the PlayStation 4 announcement leave PlayStation 3?

Jim Ryan: Typically history can help us only so far here. We’re actually still selling PS2s in regions such as the Middle East seven years after we introduced PS3. There are a number of reasons why the transition might be a bit more accelerated this time round, but PS3 is a very important part of our portfolio, certainly in 2013, 2014 and probably beyond that.

I’d point to the software line-up on PS3 that we have coming up – God of War: Ascension next month, The Last of Us, which is looking great, and Beyond later in the year. And there’s other stuff yet to be announced which is highly significant too. There’s a lot coming on PS3 and it’s going to be very important to us for some time yet.
Remember that the PlayStation 4 won't be backwards compatible with PlayStation 3 titles, so don't go trading your old console in just yet, or you'll miss out on the blockbuster PlayStation 3 titles that have yet to be announced. If Sony intends the consoles to coexist, it looks like gamers aren't going to be able to choose one or the other until the upcoming console is fully compatible with last-gen games, which is certainly going to make this transition a little trickier for developers and gamers alike.

You all, no doubt, know PETA by now—the People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals. PETA has been known to publicly attack media and games, such as Mario's tanooki suit or Pokémon Black and White Versions, rather than rallying against corporations who actually mistreat living, breathing creatures as opposed to their fictional counterparts.

This time, PETA is taking their complaints to the high seas in protest of whaling in Assassin's Creed IV: Black Flag.

"Whaling—that is, shooting whales with harpoons and leaving them to struggle for an hour or more before they die or are hacked apart while they are still alive—may seem like something out of the history books, but this bloody industry still goes on today in the face of international condemnation, and it’s disgraceful for any game to glorify it. PETA encourages video game companies to create games that celebrate animals—not games that promote hurting and killing them." — PETA

The complete oversight in comprehension, however, is what upsets me about this call to action. In depicting whaling in Assassin's Creed IV: Black Flag, Ubisoft is by no means trying to glorify the harpooning and subsequent abandonment of animals and revive the practice in modern day. Instead of encouraging gamers to go out and hunt whales, Ubisoft is trying to paint a historically accurate picture of the times in which to place fictional scenarios, and in my mind, there is absolutely nothing wrong with that.

Assassin's Creed IV: Black Flag has had the curtain lifted today and despite some early leaks we have learned a heck of a lot about the experience today. For starters, it will be coming to all available consoles including the PlayStation 4, which will feature some exclusive content (which is par for the course) and enhanced visuals over the PS3, 360, and Wii U versions of the game. However, knowing what platforms it comes on is far from what all of you are wanting to hear about right?  Right, so head inside to get the full scoop.