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Piko Interactive, a development and publishing company which focuses on releasing brand new games for retro consoles, recently acquired the rights to publish a canceled children's puzzle title for the Super Nintendo, which was set to release back in 1995.

Mr. Bloopy Saves The World, which was developed by Compedia in 1995, is a simple puzzle game in which the titular Mr. Bloopy, a round ball of goo, must go around solving simple puzzles to progress through a given stage. These include matching cards, filling in designs, and using color-swapping to do other card-matching puzzles. The game itself was canceled for no apparent reason, and several ROMs from various stages of production, including one that was nearly finished, were leaked to the internet in 2008.

Now, after five years of being available to the public, developer and homebrew publisher Piko Interactive have spoken with Compedia and obtained the rights to publish the title in a physical format. Mr. Bloopy will be released in cartridge format for the Super Nintendo sometime in the near future, with a possible NES port and ports for other classic consoles coming afterwards.

While Piko's website is underdeveloped, the company regularly promotes their new products at gaming conventions. Most recently, Piko showed off Night Defender: Third Quest, Astrohawk by Paul Lay, and Super Thor Quest at Houstin's Space City Con just this past August.


[Throwback Thursday is a series where we look back on games from the past in reviews, retrospectives, and more. We will have something every week for your retro enjoyment. You may even discover something new to love!]

Here we are at the 299th review, and the third game in the Sly Cooper franchise. So far, I think it is a fun, but flawed, franchise. Let us look at the score here. I played through the first game and thought it was a clunky and poorly-aged platformer. It had a large amount of issues that I think were overlooked, but I still liked the lighthearted story, characters, and fun level design for the stealth platforming. I then played and reviewed the second game, which is considered to be the best game by some sites; however, I think it is a bit overrated. It still has its clunky moments; levels and villains overstay their welcome. And the levels were not really built for Sly’s newly playable best friends. On the other hand, the characters were still fun, and some of the platforming was creative, even though the developers played it a bit safe at times. I just think that while it improved on the original formula, it was also filled with just some unpolished areas. Both games are still worth checking out, but get them for cheap or the Sly Cooper collection on PlayStation 3. Now then, let us talk about the third game and the last Sly Cooper game that was released until this year when the franchise returned. From what I have read and looked at, people considered this to be the weakest game in the franchise. What do I think of it? Well, it once again takes a huge step forward in improvements, but also a huge step backwards in term of design and polish. Why do I say polish, when this game came out a year after the second game? Well, how about you read on and find out?

Video Games Live, a show that combines all the best elements of a night at the symphony, a night at a rock show, and a night staying up playing video games, has just succeeded in funding a new album through Kickstarter. Before the album reached its goal, however, the team at Video Games Live put together a fantastic medley of Super Mario World music to give people a glimpse of the great music a night at the concert holds.

This particular arrangement was crafted by Tommy Tallarico, the big bossman of the production, and also in part by Wayne Strange, who is best known for his work arranging much of the live music that Zelda fans get to enjoy at Symphony of the Goddesses. If you like Super Mario World, you're in for a big treat. Head past the jump to give it a listen!

A dozen of you have read about Summer of Covers ten times now (and another dozen have skipped over it entirely—you know who you are. Shame on you). Regardless, Summer of Covers was an effort started by Carlos Eiene of Insane in the Rain Music to raise $1000 for Child's Play Charity, along with your help. Eiene would spend every day arranging, recording, and producing a new video game music cover, uploading them each under the differently-themed weeks. Speaking as a musician, believe me when I say, that's a lot of work.

But we come bearing wonderful news! Summer of Covers has reached its goal! In fact, the goal has been exceeded by a whopping $221! Donations to Child's Play Charity for the Summer of Covers cause are still open if you want to up the cash count a little bit, which I urge you to consider, because it's for a great cause. You can subscribe to Insane in the Rain Music to stay updated on Eiene's work in the future, but as celebration of the end to Summer or Covers, you can also head past the jump to get a full run-down of every Summer of Covers song ever!

Great work Carlos, and a big thumbs up to everyone who helped along the way. We done good, folks. We done good.

Summer of Covers is an effort started by Carlos Eiene of Insane in the Rain Music to raise $1000 for Child's Play Charity, along with your help. Every week, Eiene releases one new video game music cover every day, each from a different game series. This past week was End Credits week, so from Ruby and Sapphire to Super Mario World, you're bound to hear all of your favorite video game credits tunes. Even though Summer of Covers has reached its lofty goal (more on that later), you can still donate to Child's Play Charity and subscribe to Insane in the Rain Music to stay updated on Eiene's work! You can also head here to get a full run-down of every Summer of Covers song ever!

Head inside to hear all the great music... That is, if you're even still alive after going back to school yet again.

It's Saturday? What? Why didn't anybody tell me I missed Thursday?! DAMMIT JACKSON!

*ahem* So here's a belated Nintendo Download update for you all. First up is the Wii U, which received Spot the Differences: Party!, Giana Sisters: Twisted Dreams, and Chronicles of Mystara. Breath of Fire II has finally found its way to the Wii U virtual console as well. Head past the jump for the full list of titles!

Every month, Club Nintendo offers a select handful of games redeemable by Coins, the currency on the site. You can earn coins by completing surveys and registering your eligible Nintendo games on the site, and then use them to claim rewards.

This month's game rewards all cost 150 coins each, a modest sum. Available from now until October 6th are Mario vs. Donkey Kong: Minis March Again! and Art Academy: First Semester downloadable to your 3DS, and two classics for your Wii: the original Pilotwings for SNES, and the sequel to the amazing cult classic StarTropics, Zoda's Revenge: StarTropics 2.

What sounds appealing to you? I'd jump all over Zoda's Revenge if I hadn't already downloaded it the day it was brought to the virtual console. Are you interested in learning to draw? How about practicing your landing skills? What about working strategically through puzzles with mini Mario toys? Or is an amazing yet difficult NES adventure in your future? Let me know in the comments!


[Throwback Thursday is a series where we look back on games from the past in reviews, retrospectives, and more. We will have something every week for your retro enjoyment. You may even discover something new to love!]

Here we are with the next game, counting down to the 300th review! Last week, I reviewed the first game in the Sly Cooper franchise. While it might not have held up as well as I thought it would, after finally getting to play it almost 10 years after its release, I still really enjoyed the memorable characters and solid platforming experience, even though I had to deal with the tedious difficulty and rather short length. I gave the first game a 6 out of 10 because it was still a good game, but its poorly aged parts stick out like a sore thumb.

So then, what do I think of the second game, Sly 2: Band of Thieves for the PlayStation 2? I mean, all I read is that before the fourth game came out this year, the second game was the best game in the franchise, and pretty much every critic’s favorite game out of the Sly Cooper franchise. Well, I think differently about Sly 2. While I am honestly not going to rate this game as highly as every critic did a few years back, it is definitely better than the first game. It has a lot of good game design changes, but it is also held back by a lot of game design tedium. Why do I say such a thing? Read on to find out!

Summer of Covers is an effort started by Carlos Eiene of Insane in the Rain Music to raise $1000 for Child's Play Charity, along with your help. Every week, Eiene releases one new video game music cover every day, each from a different game series. This past week was 8-Bit week, featuring some of our favorite 8-Bit songs beautifully redone. We've already shared Ballad of the Windfish and Mabe Village from Link's Awakening with you, but you can head inside here to listen to every fantastic cover. Be sure to donate to Child's Play Charity, and subscribe to Insane in the Rain Music to stay updated on Summer of Covers' progress if you like Eiene's work! You can also head here to get a full list of every Summer of Covers song so far!

This next week is the last week for Summer of Covers, and it's ending with a wonderful conclusion: Credits Week! Stay tuned at Insane in the Rain Music for all the wonderful staff roll covers.

When the Nintendo 3DS launched at retail, it cost a whopping $249.99—that's as much as the Wii cost upon its release. As sales were slow, Nintendo sliced a handsome $70 off the price tag just months after its release in order to boost consumer interest, and sales started spreading like wildfire. To appease the early adopters, Nintendo introduced the "Ambassador Program," a program through which any 3DS bought and registered before the price cut would be credited twenty downloadable NES and Game Boy Advance games through the system's eShop.

With the recent announcement of the Wii U price cut, Nintendo fans are hoping that the Big N will introduce a similar program for early adopters of the console, but alas, the answer is no. Head past the jump for more.


[Throwback Thursday is a series where we look back on games from the past in reviews, retrospectives, and more. We will have something every week for your retro enjoyment. You may even discover something new to love!]

I am getting really close to my 300th review, and I wanted to do something different for it. I didn’t want to do an RPG special again since I want to do one for my 5-year special. I then looked through a list of games I wanted to play, and I came across the Sly Cooper franchise for Sony’s PlayStation 2 and 3 consoles. From what I have heard, this was always a very charming series. I was 12 or 13 when these games were coming out, and I skipped over them because I thought I was above the idea of playing a humanoid raccoon. I sadly missed over this gem of a series that has had a bit of resurgence as of late with cameo appearances in that terrible Playstation Move game and as a fighter in the underwhelming Playstation All-Stars. To lead up to the 300th review, I will be going over the four Sly Cooper games, making the recently released 4th game the 300th review.

Let us get started then with the first game, Sly Cooper and the Thievius Raccoonus for the PlayStation 2. Head past the jump to keep reading!

Bah, I'm done coming up with cheeky titles—you know this stuff by now!

Summer of Covers is an effort started by Carlos Eiene of Insane in the Rain Music to raise $1000 for Child's Play Charity, along with your help. Every week, Eiene releases one new video game music cover every day, each from a different game series. This past week was Mario week, highlighted by an incredible piano arrangement of 'File Select' and 'Dire Dire Docks,' from Super Mario 64. Head inside to listen to every fantastic Mario cover, and be sure to donate to Child's Play Charity and subscribe to Insane in the Rain Music to stay updated on Summer of Covers' progress if you like Eiene's work! You can also head here to get a full run-down of every Summer of Covers song so far!

This next week is 8-bit Week, so prepare for a nostalgiabasket of manly tears.

The Angry Video Game Nerd Adventures is an upcoming game on Steam, focusing around the internet's one and only Angry Video Game Nerd. Styled after the NES games that the Angry Video Game Nerd loathes so much—though anyone looking at the game can tell it's more impressive than 8-bit—the game promises frustration, agony, the famous AVGN humor, and tons of fun.

James Rofle, the man behind the Angry Video Game Nerd, got to play The Angry Video Game Nerd Adventures, and he says he loves it! According to Rolfe, The Angry Video Game Nerd Adventures is "the best AVGN game to date." Head past the jump to see the trailer and hear what he had to say.

Rare is currently hard at work developing Kinect Sports Rivals for Xbox One and its new Kinect, and after completing the game next year, there is a possibility they may return to their golden days and develop a title in one of their classic franchises. Rare's Simon Woodroffe has told Official Xbox Magazine that the team already has plenty of ideas floating around for Perfect Dark, Conker, Viva Piñata, and Banjo-Kazooie, and later revealed that the team is eager to work on a Banjo project.

“When we launched Kinect obviously there was a big focus on ‘everything must be Kinect.’ Now it’s in the box, use it where it make sense, don’t where it doesn’t. It can be used in some really – not gimmicky ways, which is what I think you’ll see a fair amount of – but ways that actually really enhance the game. We’ve got some ideas for how to use it in the right way. ... We’ve got ideas for most older Rare IP, you won’t be surprised to hear. There’s quite a lot of desire to do that, and Viva Pinata, Conker… Banjo’s very popular internally, a lot of people want to do stuff with Banjo.

Head past the jump for more!


[Throwback Thursday is a series where we look back on games from the past in reviews, retrospectives, and more. We will have something every week for your retro enjoyment. You may even discover something new to love!]

Since I just mentioned Armikrog, Doug Tenapel’s upcoming adventure game, in my Blazing Dragons review, why not talk a little about this popular artist? For most gamers, Doug Tenapel is famous for the Earthworm Jim games in the 90s, some of the most memorable and popular games from the time of the Super Nintendo and Genesis. After leaving Shiny Entertainment, Doug Tenapel, along with a few other ex-Shiny employees, founded The Neverhood, Inc., and from what I researched, made only three games.

The first game was the cult classic PC adventure game, The Neverhood Chronicles, or The Neverhood for short. Didn’t sell well, but became a cult classic game that is now very expensive. The next game was named Skullmonkeys for the PlayStation. Didn’t sell well either, but it also became a cult classic that is now expensive online. The final game was called Boombots, a Power Stone-style fighting game for the PlayStation. As you can guess, it didn’t sell well, but from what I have seen online, it hasn’t become a super pricey game or a cult classic. Why? Out of all three games, why didn’t this one get the same response? It still has a lot of the elements of The Neverhood, Inc.’s past games like stop-motion Claymation and the trademark humor of the games. Let’s find out then why this little 3D fighting game is often forgotten by many gamers.