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This week's downloadable goodies are all about Final Fight 1-3 being added to the Wii U virtual console. There's a promotion going on as well: if you buy any Final Fight game, you can get a select fighting game half off, including Street Fighter II Turbo: Hyper Fighting. This offer is only good until 9am PST next Thursday, October 10th.

Also on the eShop for Wii U this week are TNT Racers – Nitro Machines Edition, Just Dance 2014 (available October 8th), and a discount on Little Inferno.

On the 3DS this week we have Picross e3, Family Bowling 3D, Happy Circus, Halloween: Trick or Treat 2, Rhythm Thief & the Emperor's Treasure, Jewel Quest 5 – The Sleeping Star, and a demo for Witch & Hero.

Anything sound interesting to you this week? Any old-school fighter fans going to take advantage of that deal? Let me know in the comments!

Okay, so The Mini Mario Orchestra isn't exactly an orchestra, but it's got a pretty damn good sound. Not long ago, The Mini Mario Orchestra uploaded a song to YouTube called "The Ultimate Nintendo Medley," and it is truly grand. In "The Ultimate Nintendo Medley," you'll hear songs from Nintendo all-stars like Mario and Zelda, alongside some of their B-list franchises, like Animal Crossing, F-Zero, and Mother.

Despite a few errors in song titles, "The Ultimate Nintendo Medley" deserves the seven minutes it will take from your day. If you're a fan of Nintendo and its music, this video is a must-listen. And if you like kooky conductors in funny hats, then it's all the more worth it. Head inside to give the music video a watch!

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Let’s play a little game. Show a kid a picture of Mega Man X and ask them who the character is. If they actually know who the image depicts, it is very likely they will say, "Hey, that’s the old Mega Man!", being used to the more recent iterations of the franchise, such as Mega Man Battle Network or Star Force. But for me and my peers, nearly twenty years ago, after following the original Blue Bomber on the NES for a long time, X was the new Mega Man, the one who replaced the classic one, and kids on the neighborhood got engaged in battles about which one was better. To this day, I still call Mega Man X, "the new Mega Man" from time to time. In the end I guess, it’s all a matter of viewer’s perspective…

A whopping two decades have passed since the time those memories take place in, and boy, things have changed. So many incarnations, so many series and subseries. The Mega Man universe is now as messy as the Zelda timeline. But remembering those good old days, I fondly recall that when me and my friends fought over which was the coolest version of the Blue Bomber, I used to root in favor of the original one. But that was before I actually played the new game… and boy, I was so wrong. I had to swallow my words and admit that Mega Man X for the Super NES was the awesomest of awesome!

Head past the jump to find why I think this game is so awesome.


[Throwback Thursday is a series where we look back on games from the past in reviews, retrospectives, and more. We will have something every week for your retro enjoyment. You may even discover something new to love!]

Donkey Kong 64, the sequel to the Donkey Kong Country series made by Rare, recently revived by Retro Studios, sees Donkey return to fight the villainous Kremlings, led by the evil King K. Rool. The Kremlings are up to no good again, and decide to blow up DK Isle, residence of our furry friends. They try to capture Donkey and his friends Diddy, Tiny, Lanky and Chunky, but they fail to capture Donkey, who sets out to rescue his friends, collect Golden Bananas, and defeat the Kremling king.

When you step into the overworld for the first time, you can see that those awful Kremlings have parked their big mechanical island right next to your normal island. But, they have something attached. What could that be? DK decides to check it out, and it appears there's a big, friendly Kremling in there, imprisoned by that monster that calls himself king. You decide to help the Kremling, called K. Lumsy, and you travel across 8 different worlds, trying to get the keys to his prison. That's pretty much all there is to the story, if you don't count small cutscenes between worlds of K. Rool having a breakdown. Pretty simplistic, but it works well enough.

For the complete review, click the jump!

Listings for pre-orders of Hyperkin's much-anticipated retro game machine, the RetroN5, started appearing across various websites this last week. As expected, the RetroN5 will retail for $99.99, and it was announced today that it will be released on December 10th!

Amazon.com also had listings appear recently for both black and gray models of the device, but mysteriously vanished soon after. Hyperkin has also erased their links to this and other pre-order sites from their official Facebook page where the news originally went out, and they have yet to comment as to why. As of this writing, Retro Quest is still taking pre-orders for the machine. Retro Quest is a group that makes reproduction cartridges of classic games in English for territories that never got an official translation, with their most popular one being Mother 3.

For more information on just what the RetroN5 is and a video showcasing some of what it can do, be sure to hit the jump!

What do you get when you make a modern 16-bit-esque game? Is that an oxymoron? The answer to at least one of those questions may be Hyper Light Drifter. HLD is looking like one of the coolest indie games to come out in a while. It looks like the gaming community agrees: six days ago, indie developer Heart Machine posted their project on Kickstarter with a goal of raising $27,000 in 30 days. Since then, they've already shattered their goal by raising $225,000 as of this writing. They're not resting on their laurels with the extra cash, either, as they've set some awesome stretch goals -- but they've blown past so many that they're literally running out.

Check out the trailer and new features they're adding in advance of the release after the jump!

Piko Interactive, a development and publishing company which focuses on releasing brand new games for retro consoles, recently acquired the rights to publish a canceled children's puzzle title for the Super Nintendo, which was set to release back in 1995.

Mr. Bloopy Saves The World, which was developed by Compedia in 1995, is a simple puzzle game in which the titular Mr. Bloopy, a round ball of goo, must go around solving simple puzzles to progress through a given stage. These include matching cards, filling in designs, and using color-swapping to do other card-matching puzzles. The game itself was canceled for no apparent reason, and several ROMs from various stages of production, including one that was nearly finished, were leaked to the internet in 2008.

Now, after five years of being available to the public, developer and homebrew publisher Piko Interactive have spoken with Compedia and obtained the rights to publish the title in a physical format. Mr. Bloopy will be released in cartridge format for the Super Nintendo sometime in the near future, with a possible NES port and ports for other classic consoles coming afterwards.

While Piko's website is underdeveloped, the company regularly promotes their new products at gaming conventions. Most recently, Piko showed off Night Defender: Third Quest, Astrohawk by Paul Lay, and Super Thor Quest at Houstin's Space City Con just this past August.


[Throwback Thursday is a series where we look back on games from the past in reviews, retrospectives, and more. We will have something every week for your retro enjoyment. You may even discover something new to love!]

Here we are at the 299th review, and the third game in the Sly Cooper franchise. So far, I think it is a fun, but flawed, franchise. Let us look at the score here. I played through the first game and thought it was a clunky and poorly-aged platformer. It had a large amount of issues that I think were overlooked, but I still liked the lighthearted story, characters, and fun level design for the stealth platforming. I then played and reviewed the second game, which is considered to be the best game by some sites; however, I think it is a bit overrated. It still has its clunky moments; levels and villains overstay their welcome. And the levels were not really built for Sly’s newly playable best friends. On the other hand, the characters were still fun, and some of the platforming was creative, even though the developers played it a bit safe at times. I just think that while it improved on the original formula, it was also filled with just some unpolished areas. Both games are still worth checking out, but get them for cheap or the Sly Cooper collection on PlayStation 3. Now then, let us talk about the third game and the last Sly Cooper game that was released until this year when the franchise returned. From what I have read and looked at, people considered this to be the weakest game in the franchise. What do I think of it? Well, it once again takes a huge step forward in improvements, but also a huge step backwards in term of design and polish. Why do I say polish, when this game came out a year after the second game? Well, how about you read on and find out?

Video Games Live, a show that combines all the best elements of a night at the symphony, a night at a rock show, and a night staying up playing video games, has just succeeded in funding a new album through Kickstarter. Before the album reached its goal, however, the team at Video Games Live put together a fantastic medley of Super Mario World music to give people a glimpse of the great music a night at the concert holds.

This particular arrangement was crafted by Tommy Tallarico, the big bossman of the production, and also in part by Wayne Strange, who is best known for his work arranging much of the live music that Zelda fans get to enjoy at Symphony of the Goddesses. If you like Super Mario World, you're in for a big treat. Head past the jump to give it a listen!

A dozen of you have read about Summer of Covers ten times now (and another dozen have skipped over it entirely—you know who you are. Shame on you). Regardless, Summer of Covers was an effort started by Carlos Eiene of Insane in the Rain Music to raise $1000 for Child's Play Charity, along with your help. Eiene would spend every day arranging, recording, and producing a new video game music cover, uploading them each under the differently-themed weeks. Speaking as a musician, believe me when I say, that's a lot of work.

But we come bearing wonderful news! Summer of Covers has reached its goal! In fact, the goal has been exceeded by a whopping $221! Donations to Child's Play Charity for the Summer of Covers cause are still open if you want to up the cash count a little bit, which I urge you to consider, because it's for a great cause. You can subscribe to Insane in the Rain Music to stay updated on Eiene's work in the future, but as celebration of the end to Summer or Covers, you can also head past the jump to get a full run-down of every Summer of Covers song ever!

Great work Carlos, and a big thumbs up to everyone who helped along the way. We done good, folks. We done good.

Summer of Covers is an effort started by Carlos Eiene of Insane in the Rain Music to raise $1000 for Child's Play Charity, along with your help. Every week, Eiene releases one new video game music cover every day, each from a different game series. This past week was End Credits week, so from Ruby and Sapphire to Super Mario World, you're bound to hear all of your favorite video game credits tunes. Even though Summer of Covers has reached its lofty goal (more on that later), you can still donate to Child's Play Charity and subscribe to Insane in the Rain Music to stay updated on Eiene's work! You can also head here to get a full run-down of every Summer of Covers song ever!

Head inside to hear all the great music... That is, if you're even still alive after going back to school yet again.

It's Saturday? What? Why didn't anybody tell me I missed Thursday?! DAMMIT JACKSON!

*ahem* So here's a belated Nintendo Download update for you all. First up is the Wii U, which received Spot the Differences: Party!, Giana Sisters: Twisted Dreams, and Chronicles of Mystara. Breath of Fire II has finally found its way to the Wii U virtual console as well. Head past the jump for the full list of titles!

Every month, Club Nintendo offers a select handful of games redeemable by Coins, the currency on the site. You can earn coins by completing surveys and registering your eligible Nintendo games on the site, and then use them to claim rewards.

This month's game rewards all cost 150 coins each, a modest sum. Available from now until October 6th are Mario vs. Donkey Kong: Minis March Again! and Art Academy: First Semester downloadable to your 3DS, and two classics for your Wii: the original Pilotwings for SNES, and the sequel to the amazing cult classic StarTropics, Zoda's Revenge: StarTropics 2.

What sounds appealing to you? I'd jump all over Zoda's Revenge if I hadn't already downloaded it the day it was brought to the virtual console. Are you interested in learning to draw? How about practicing your landing skills? What about working strategically through puzzles with mini Mario toys? Or is an amazing yet difficult NES adventure in your future? Let me know in the comments!


[Throwback Thursday is a series where we look back on games from the past in reviews, retrospectives, and more. We will have something every week for your retro enjoyment. You may even discover something new to love!]

Here we are with the next game, counting down to the 300th review! Last week, I reviewed the first game in the Sly Cooper franchise. While it might not have held up as well as I thought it would, after finally getting to play it almost 10 years after its release, I still really enjoyed the memorable characters and solid platforming experience, even though I had to deal with the tedious difficulty and rather short length. I gave the first game a 6 out of 10 because it was still a good game, but its poorly aged parts stick out like a sore thumb.

So then, what do I think of the second game, Sly 2: Band of Thieves for the PlayStation 2? I mean, all I read is that before the fourth game came out this year, the second game was the best game in the franchise, and pretty much every critic’s favorite game out of the Sly Cooper franchise. Well, I think differently about Sly 2. While I am honestly not going to rate this game as highly as every critic did a few years back, it is definitely better than the first game. It has a lot of good game design changes, but it is also held back by a lot of game design tedium. Why do I say such a thing? Read on to find out!

Summer of Covers is an effort started by Carlos Eiene of Insane in the Rain Music to raise $1000 for Child's Play Charity, along with your help. Every week, Eiene releases one new video game music cover every day, each from a different game series. This past week was 8-Bit week, featuring some of our favorite 8-Bit songs beautifully redone. We've already shared Ballad of the Windfish and Mabe Village from Link's Awakening with you, but you can head inside here to listen to every fantastic cover. Be sure to donate to Child's Play Charity, and subscribe to Insane in the Rain Music to stay updated on Summer of Covers' progress if you like Eiene's work! You can also head here to get a full list of every Summer of Covers song so far!

This next week is the last week for Summer of Covers, and it's ending with a wonderful conclusion: Credits Week! Stay tuned at Insane in the Rain Music for all the wonderful staff roll covers.